24 hour Pet Hospital, 24 hour vet, 24 hour vet Melbourne, 24/7 Vet, 24hr Vet, Animal Accident Emergency, Animal Care, Animal Emergency, Animal Hospital, Animal Hospital Melbourne, Animal Services, Australia, Cat, Dog, Easter, Melbourne, Melbourne Animal Hospital, Melbourne city, Pet, Pet Advice, Pet Care, Pet Emergency, Pet Emergency Centre, Pet emergency melbourne, Uncategorized, Vet

Vet OPEN Easter Holidays

Vet Open Easter Holidays

VET OPEN GOOD FRIDAY, EASTER SUNDAY & EASTER MONDAY

Animal Accident & Emergency

will be OPEN 24/7 during the Easter Holiday period.

Our Pet Emergency Centres are always open as we never close even on public holidays.

If you need a vet on Good Friday, Easter Sunday or Easter Monday

then please contact one of our 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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FLUTD is a major emergency for cats as it can cause death

cat sitting in a box

FLUTD is a major emergency as it can cause death. The urethra is tube that connects the bladder and penis. If this becomes blocked, you cannot urinate. In some cases the bladder will burst.

If you cannot urinate, you body starts to build up toxins from the kidneys. These toxins can cause death by affecting the heart and other organs. FLUTD can be a common problem in male cats.

If you notice that your cat is unwell, licking his genital area more than normal and straining to go to the toilet, then they should be checked. Other common signs can include frequently using the litter tray and only urinating a couple of drops. Sometimes you may see blood in the urine.

There are many causes of FLUTD. Sometimes a special diet is required to reduce crystals forming in the urine.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour Animal Hospitals in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking.

Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your cat is FLUTD or for any other veterinarian emergency, please contact one of our 24-hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

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36 degrees today & tomorrow – Keep your Pets Cool

dog and ice
Tips to avoid heat stress/stroke:
  • Provide a cool  shaded area
  • Provide plenty of clean fresh water and extra water sources in case of spillage.
  • Bring animals indoors on hot, with the air-conditioning or fan on.
  • Do not exercise animals in hot weather conditions. Walk your dog very early in the morning or very late in the afternoon and avoid the hottest part of the day.
  • Do not leave your dog in a vehicle – even when the windows are down dogs can still overheat and die.

 

If you think your pet is suffering from heat stroke, please call Animal Accident & Emergency or contact your local vet without delay.

 

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Von Willebrand’s Disease – The Inherited Bleeding Disorder

 All 4 dogs picture blog

Von Willebrand’s disease is a genetic bleeding disorder that is found in all breeds of dogs, but more commonly in certain breeds, such as Dobermans, Rottweilers, Scottish Terriers, German Shepherds and German Short Haired pointers. It is caused by a deficiency in a specific blood clotting factor that helps platelets to bind broken blood vessels and start to form a blood clot. Without veterinary treatment, von Willebrand’s disease can be life threatening when the pet’s body needs to deal with any form of internal or external bleeding. When this blood clotting factor deficiency is present (known as the von Willebrand factor), even a small injury can lead to excessive blood loss and potentially anaemia, as the blood is unable to clot normally.

While the specific clinical signs for von Willebrand’s disease aren’t always obvious for pet owners to spot, any sign of excessive bleeding should be treated as an animal emergency and the pet needs to be taken to a 24 hour vet clinic immediately. Also, while pets are born with this disease present in their body, they may not show any effects of the bleeding disorder until later in life when they have a surgery or injury that causes bleeding.

The most common clinical signs that may be seen are:

  • Excessive bleeding from injuries/lacerations
  • Sudden bleeding from the nose, gums or vagina
  • Blood present in urine
  • Excessive bleeding after females give birth
  • Prolonged bleeding after veterinary procedures/surgery

When veterinarians suspect that pets may have von Willebrand’s disease, the most common diagnostic test performed is the buccal mucosal bleeding time. This tests how well blood clotting platelets are working by by making a small incision in the pet’s gum and timing how long it takes for the bleeding to stop. Blood tests are also used to check how much of the von Willebrand’s factor is present in the blood.

When the disease becomes an emergency situation, 24hr emergency vets will often need to use plasma transfusions to stabilise the pet and return clotting factors to the bloodstream. Blood transfusions may also be required if there has been significant blood loss. After transfusions, animals will generally need to remain in a 24 hour pet hospital for ongoing monitoring and care, as well as potentially more transfusions.

There is unfortunately no cure for von Willebrand’s disease. However, it is still highly important to know if the disease is present in pets, especially Dobermans (as they are particularly prone to the disease), as this is crucial information if pets ever require surgery or if any sudden injuries occur. Owners of pets with von Willebrand’s disease can also help to prevent any excessive bleeding crisis’ from happening by avoiding high levels of stress and particular medications when possible, as these can worsen the effects of the disorder. While von Willebrand’s disease cannot be cured, most pets with this condition can still go on to lead long, happy and completely normal lives with the appropriate veterinary care.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook – both with easy freeway access and ample parking. Our animal hospitals are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating every vet emergency from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that they will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be have von Willebrand’s disease, or for any veterinarian emergency, please phone one of our 24 hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We’re Always Open, Always Care

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Radio-iodine treatment for feline hyperthyroidism

Hypertyroidism Animal Accident & Emergency

What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a common condition of older cats resulting from excessive amounts thyroid hormone in the blood stream.  The majority of cats will have a benign thyroid tumour causing this condition but some may have a thyroid cancer.  The excessive thyroid hormone in the body speeds up the metabolic rate resulting in the common clinical signs of weight loss, increased appetite and thirst, increased activity and excitability, vomiting and diarrhoea.  A large thyroid gland, increased heart rate, presence of a heart murmur and increased blood pressure may be reported from the physical examination.  The diagnosis is usually made by means of a blood test although sometimes additional testing is required.

 

How can it be treated?

There are three methods of treatment in Australia: daily medical treatment at home for life, radio-iodine therapy or surgery.  Daily medical treatment will be suitable for some cats but it will not cure the condition and periodic examinations together with blood tests will be required to monitor the cat whilst it is being medicated.  Some cats may not be able to tolerate the drugs used to prevent thyroid hormone production due to side effects and other treatment options will be recommended instead.  Radio-iodine is a simple, effective (over 95% of cats treated will have normal thyroid function after a single treatment) and usually single treatment.  Whilst administration of radio-iodine does require sedation and hospitalisation (at a special licenced facility to allow the radiation to decay), the risk associated with this treatment is low.  Hyperthyroidism may alternatively be treated by surgery to remove the affected thyroid gland (thyroidectomy).  This will require a general anaesthetic and there can be complications following the surgery.

Each cat treated with radio-iodine (or thyroidectomy) will need to be assessed for the presence of other illnesses before the treatment goes ahead.  This is to make sure that there will not be any complications either during the administration of radio-iodine, during surgery or later when the thyroid hormone has decreased to normal.  Both radio-iodine therapy and thyroidectomy provide a non-reversible treatment and one consequence of reducing the thyroid hormone to normal in the blood stream is that for some cats kidney disease may become unmasked by this process.  Those cats which will suffer kidney disease when their hyperthyroidism is treated cannot be predicted from initial blood and urine tests.  This is why many veterinarians will suggest a medical treatment trial (where possible) to reduce the thyroid hormone to normal.  When the thyroid hormone has reduced to normal, blood and urine tests are used to assess how well the kidneys are working.  If the kidneys are not working properly, recommendations will be made depending on the severity of the decreased function.  For some cats this may mean that radio-iodine and surgery are not recommended.  Alternatively, it may mean that the radio-iodine treatment or surgery is postponed while the medication is continued and the kidney function is regularly checked.

 

What will happen to my cat during the treatment?

Typically, our cats will be admitted on a Monday (before 12 noon) for treatment the following day.  Food is taken out of the cage later in the evening and water is left for the cats to drink overnight.  Sedation is given on the Tuesday to administer the radio-iodine capsule by mouth.  Even if your cat is good at taking medications, sedation will be used to reduce the risk of radiation spillage should the cat not swallow the capsule.  There are strict laws that govern the handling of radiation in Australia.  Administration of the capsule is done in a designated area of our hospital where our patients are then housed during their stay.  Their body is scanned by a Geiger counter to ensure that the capsule has been swallowed properly.  The radiation needs to reduce (decay) to a certain amount and this will usually take a week.  Owners are not able to visit their cats whilst hospitalised due to radiation safety regulations.  During this period, the cats are observed frequently and fed twice daily.  Whilst we provide high quality cat food, some cats may become fussy eaters away from home and we encourage owners to provide a small supply of their favourite food so that their cat may be tempted to eat if they do not enjoy the food offered.  Similarly, we provide bedding but if bedding is provided from home it cannot be returned.

 

What do I need to do when my cat returns home?

There will be some residual radiation in the cat’s body and prolonged close contact should be avoided for the first week that the cat is home.  This means that your cat may not sleep on the bed with anyone at night or on their laps or be held for periods that exceed 30 minutes per day.  Any pregnant women or children should not have any contact with the cat for the first week that it is home.

The radiation does not work immediately and you may not notice too much difference in your cat’s health at first when they return home.  The radiation continues to works it effect over the next weeks to months and we therefore suggest that a blood sample is collected one month after treatment to assess the response.  This may be taken at our clinic or by your referring veterinarian.

If you are concerned regarding your cats health once home, please do not hesitate to contact our clinic.

 

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

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24 hour Vet Clinic Open Queens Birthday long weekend – Melbourne

 

Queensbirthday

We are OPEN on the

Queens Birthday Public Holiday

Public Holiday Consult fee is $170

(Effective from 8pm Sunday 8th June 2014)

If you have concerns or you are looking for a vet that is now open, please phone one of our Pet Emergency Centre:

Essendon Fields 9379 0700
Point Cook 8368 7400

Our Vet Clinics are Always Open, We always CARE

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Animal Accident & Emergency is seeking a full time Veterinarian

NURSES

Animal Accident & Emergency is seeking applications for a full time veterinarian. We are seeking applicants with experience in emergency and critical care. Animal Accident & Emergency operates 24/7 at two locations. The position will involve shift work at both emergency centres. Our centres are fully equipped and would suit applicants looking to further their career within emergency and critical care. You should be motivated, communicate well and have the ability to teamwork. You must also display a commitment to continuing education and willingness to learn.
We believe in a team approach with a supportive environment. Our Medical Director is a Registered Specialist in Emergency and Critical Care.
The ideal applicant would have Membership in emergency (ANZCVSc) or preparing to sit for membership within the next 12 months. Applicants with less experience will be considered. Employment is shift based, with rotations involving day, night, weekend and public holiday shifts. The average working week is 37.5 hrs.

Please send applications to jobs@animalemergency.com.au Applications will close on the 27th June 2014.

 

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