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We do not recommend Rabbits and Guinea Pigs together – Melbourne Vet advice

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic

Guinea Pigs and Rabbits should not be put together

We do not recommend rabbits and guinea pigs together for the following reasons:

  • Rabbits may hog the food
  • Rabbits may bully the guinea pigs.
  • Guinea pigs can cause severe eye injuries to rabbits.
  • Rabbits carry a bacteria Bordetella that is lethal to guinea pigs
  • They require different feeding regimes
  • Rabbits talk ‘rabbit’ with rabbits and guinea pigs talk ‘pig’ with guinea pigs.

Guinea pigs rarely cohabit well with other species. If you have indoor dogs and cats you need to a secure enclosure.

The Melbourne Rabbit Clinic is the first and only hospital in Australia to treat rabbits and guinea pigs exclusively.

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic have an absolute passion for rabbits and guinea pigs offering high quality veterinary care especially tailored for Rabbits and Guinea Pigs.

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic is consulting at Animal Accident & Emergency our 24 hour Vet Emergency Centres – Essendon Fields & Point Cook

To book an appointment please ring the Melbourne Rabbit Clinic directly on (03) 9758 9879.

For more information please visit our website: www.animalemergency.com.au

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Great Dan Eats 43 Socks!

 

dog eats 43 socks

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As all dog owners know, our dogs love to chew anything and everything. When they are puppies, it seems as if chewing toys, bones, socks or anything around the house is just a normal occurrence. However, sometimes our puppies and/or older dogs swallow something that just doesn’t go down as it should and can be potentially dangerous. It’s important to find out immediately what your dog has ingested.

Signs that your dog might have swallowed a something foreign

  • Sudden onset of choking that affects your dog’s breathing should be dealt with urgently.
  • Signs of intestinal or digestive discomfort
  • Vomiting and possibly diarrhea

You should next try to find out what toy or parts of a toy are and items are still around. You can then figure out what your poor dog might have swallowed to give your veterinarian a point of reference.

 

Your dog is choking – Pet Emergency

If your dog is choking on something, the best thing you can do is try to help your dog immediately. Choking for big dogs and small dogs are handled differently. Just as in humans, the goal is to get it out of your dog’s system immediately.

If you believe that your pet may have swallowed a bone or toy, then you need to contact us directly. We have two convenient emergency centers. Our Emergency Centres run 24Hr Intensive Care Units.

Animal Accident & Emergency – Essendon Fields 9379 0700

Animal Accident & Emergency – Point Cook  8368 7400

 

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Pet First Aid Workshop in Melbourne

Pet First Aid WorkShop

Pet First Aid WorkShop

Animal Accident & Emergency is running a 3 hour Pet First Aid workshop course in Melbourne on:

*Sunday 3rd August 2014 from 9am – 12pm
*Sunday 17th August 2014 from 9am – 12pm

This course is open to the public and recommended especially for those who work with pets – foster carers, pet sitters, rescue workers etc

The course will cover common emergencies and first aid:

– CPR – practice on a dog mannequin

– Rescue breaths

– Bleeding

– Bandaging

– Shock

– Choking

– Bites & stings

– Burns

– Eye injuries

– Ear injuries

– Nose injuries

– Broken bones

– Sprains

– Heat stress

– Seizures

– Poisoning/toxicities


To enroll or for more information please click on the link below: http://www.petemergencystore.com.au/Pet First Aid Course

 

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Von Willebrand’s Disease – The Inherited Bleeding Disorder

 All 4 dogs picture blog

Von Willebrand’s disease is a genetic bleeding disorder that is found in all breeds of dogs, but more commonly in certain breeds, such as Dobermans, Rottweilers, Scottish Terriers, German Shepherds and German Short Haired pointers. It is caused by a deficiency in a specific blood clotting factor that helps platelets to bind broken blood vessels and start to form a blood clot. Without veterinary treatment, von Willebrand’s disease can be life threatening when the pet’s body needs to deal with any form of internal or external bleeding. When this blood clotting factor deficiency is present (known as the von Willebrand factor), even a small injury can lead to excessive blood loss and potentially anaemia, as the blood is unable to clot normally.

While the specific clinical signs for von Willebrand’s disease aren’t always obvious for pet owners to spot, any sign of excessive bleeding should be treated as an animal emergency and the pet needs to be taken to a 24 hour vet clinic immediately. Also, while pets are born with this disease present in their body, they may not show any effects of the bleeding disorder until later in life when they have a surgery or injury that causes bleeding.

The most common clinical signs that may be seen are:

  • Excessive bleeding from injuries/lacerations
  • Sudden bleeding from the nose, gums or vagina
  • Blood present in urine
  • Excessive bleeding after females give birth
  • Prolonged bleeding after veterinary procedures/surgery

When veterinarians suspect that pets may have von Willebrand’s disease, the most common diagnostic test performed is the buccal mucosal bleeding time. This tests how well blood clotting platelets are working by by making a small incision in the pet’s gum and timing how long it takes for the bleeding to stop. Blood tests are also used to check how much of the von Willebrand’s factor is present in the blood.

When the disease becomes an emergency situation, 24hr emergency vets will often need to use plasma transfusions to stabilise the pet and return clotting factors to the bloodstream. Blood transfusions may also be required if there has been significant blood loss. After transfusions, animals will generally need to remain in a 24 hour pet hospital for ongoing monitoring and care, as well as potentially more transfusions.

There is unfortunately no cure for von Willebrand’s disease. However, it is still highly important to know if the disease is present in pets, especially Dobermans (as they are particularly prone to the disease), as this is crucial information if pets ever require surgery or if any sudden injuries occur. Owners of pets with von Willebrand’s disease can also help to prevent any excessive bleeding crisis’ from happening by avoiding high levels of stress and particular medications when possible, as these can worsen the effects of the disorder. While von Willebrand’s disease cannot be cured, most pets with this condition can still go on to lead long, happy and completely normal lives with the appropriate veterinary care.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook – both with easy freeway access and ample parking. Our animal hospitals are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating every vet emergency from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that they will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be have von Willebrand’s disease, or for any veterinarian emergency, please phone one of our 24 hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We’re Always Open, Always Care

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www.animalemergency.com.au

 

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Knowing When Your Pet Needs a Caesarean

Animal Hospital Animal Accident Emergency Puppies

A caesarean section is a major surgical procedure used to deliver babies when normal birth isn’t possible. This is done by surgically entering the abdomen to remove the babies directly from the uterus. While caesareans are sometimes needed for cats, they are a lot more common with dogs, especially particular breeds such as bull dogs. However, birth complications are life threatening to all mothers and their offspring when delivery isn’t progressing normally, regardless of species or breed. Therefore, pets experiencing birth complications may be in need of a caesarean and must be taken to a 24 hour vet clinic immediately for emergency surgery.

In most cases, pet owners won’t be aware that their pet is in need of a caesarean until they begin giving birth. When your pet is pregnant and close to giving birth, it is important to keep a close eye on them, especially during the delivery, and be at the ready to take them to a 24hr animal hospital in an emergency.

When your pet is in labour, the most obvious signs that they may be in need of a caesarean are:
• Your pet has been having contractions for more than 2 hours without delivering a puppy/kitten (even after the first delivery)
• Your pet appears too tired to push out the puppy/kitten
• There is a puppy/kitten stuck in the birth canal
• If your pet hasn’t delivered all puppies/kittens (providing you have had x-rays taken to determine the litter size)
• If there is a green discharge from the vulva and no puppies/kittens are produced

A caesarean section will normally take between 1-1.5 hours by an experienced emergency veterinarian and then a further 1-3 hours for recovery in a pet hospital. During the surgery and post-operative care, your pet will be closely monitored and administered anaesthetic, pain relief, IV fluids and antibiotics. Puppies/kittens will also be closely monitored to ensure they are suckling well and kept clean, dry and warm.

Generally within a few hours after surgery, your pet and her new puppies/kittens will be discharged to return home. It is important to allow your pets to have some time alone together to feed and bond, while still keeping an eye on them. Pet owners should also remember to bring their pet in for a veterinary check-up 1-2 days after surgery, and stitches will need to be removed in 10-14 days following surgery. Your vet will be able to instruct you on any additional pet care required and schedule an appropriate time to begin vaccinations and worming treatment (usually between 3-6 weeks after birth).

It is important to closely monitor your pet and her new puppies/kittens and contact a 24 hour veterinary clinic if you have any concerns at all. If you notice any of the following then it may be an animal emergency (such as mastitis, eclampsia or unwell puppies/kittens), which needs to be seen by a 24hr emergency vet urgently:

  • The puppies/kittens aren’t feeding regularly or at all (roughly every 3 hours is normal)
  • The puppies/kittens are crying excessively (they should be sleeping or feeding 90% of the time)
  •  The puppies/kittens are cold (their environment should be kept at roughly 30°c)
  •  The caesarean wound is discharging, red or inflamed
  •  Mammary glands are swollen, inflamed, hard or painful
  •  Mother reluctant to nurse or appears impatient with the puppies/kittens
  •  Any signs of fever/high temperature, shaking, tremors, seizures or high heart rate

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour Animal Hospitals in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be in need of a caesarean section or for any other veterinarian emergency, please contact one of our 24-hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

Always Open. We Always CARE

 

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http://www.animalemergeny.com.au

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