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Anzac Day – Vet Clinic Open Melbourne

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Our Pet Emergency Centres will open 24/7 on Anzac Day should you need us.

If you need a veterinary help, then please contact one of our 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

www.animalemergency.com.au

 

Sergeant Major dog.jpgPrivate Keith McDonald of South Yarra black and tan Alsation dog war.jpgBoer War Nurses.jpgAnzac Day

AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL

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Vet OPEN Easter Holidays

Vet Open Easter Holidays

VET OPEN GOOD FRIDAY, EASTER SUNDAY & EASTER MONDAY

Animal Accident & Emergency

will be OPEN 24/7 during the Easter Holiday period.

Our Pet Emergency Centres are always open as we never close even on public holidays.

If you need a vet on Good Friday, Easter Sunday or Easter Monday

then please contact one of our 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Pet Owners Extreme Heat Forecast

******* EXTREME HEAT FORECAST ******

Melbourne’s forecast tomorrow is for extreme heat. Extreme heat causes significant stress for all animals.

To reduce the impacts of high temperatures on your pet, please ensure:

* the provision of a plentiful supply of clean cool water
* shade is essential if your pet is outside
* walk your dog early to avoid the hot mid day sun
* don’t over exercise
* never leave your pet in a hot car
* provide ice blocks and/or wet towels

If you are concerned your pet is be suffering from the heat get veterinary help immediately or one of our 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Animal Accident & Emergency:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Valentines Day Chocolate Toxicity Warning

Valenties Chocolate Toxity Warning

***Valentines Day Chocolate Toxicity Warning***

Valentine’s Day is a time to spoil our beloveds, woo our secret lovers, and remember to call our mothers which means that Melbourne households will be filling up with chocolate. We are asking all pet owners to be cautious of chocolate around your pets especially this weekend.

Older pets, or animals with pre-existing heart conditions, are more susceptible to the effects of chocolate poisoning and at higher risk of sudden death due to cardiac arrest.

The common clinical signs of chocolate poisoning are:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • increased thirst
  • panting or restlessness
  • excessive urination
  • muscle spasms and tremors
  • seizures
  • increased temperature
  • increased heart rate
  • abnormal behaviour

 

Chocolate Toxity Emergency Vet Centre Melbourne

Why Chocolate is dangerous to pets:

Cooking/baking chocolate and dark chocolate pose the biggest danger, as they contain the largest concentration of theobromine. A 10kg dog would only have to eat 50 grams of milk chocolate to show clinical signs of chocolate toxicity or as little as 30 grams of dark chocolate. Whereas a mere 15 grams of baking chocolate (containing 70% cocoa) could lead to chocolate toxicity. Keep in mind that if the chocolate contains other harmful ingredients such as raisins/sultanas, alcohol or macadamia nuts then it may cause further complications.

It contains the alkaloid theobromine, which has similar effects as caffeine and is poisonous in large amounts. The toxicity level of the chocolate depends on the type and amount that is consumed, as well as the size of the dog. Toxic doses are generally considered to be 100mg of theobromine per kilogram of body weight, with fatal doses often occurring at over 200mg per kilogram.

Ingestion of chocolate in dogs does often lead to significant illness and so should be taken seriously by pet owners and treated as an animal emergency. As with all things, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so if you believe your dog has ingested any amount of chocolate you should immediately consult an emergency veterinarian and bring it in for examination at a 24 hour animal emergency centre.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Veterinarian OPEN Public Holidays

Chihuahua Vet Emergency

24 Hour Vet Care Melbourne

Animal Accident and Emergency (AAE) is a purpose-built animal emergency centre servicing Melbourne.  It provides 24-hour animal emergency services.  There are two great locations – Essendon and Point Cook.  The centres are located to provide direct and easy freeway access.  Time is precious in any emergency.

Our Melbourne Vet Emergency Centres provide dedicated emergency care 24/7.  We are not just an after hours vet clinic.  Our whole focus is emergency and critical care.

If you have a Veterinarian emergency please contact one of our 24 Hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

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Is Your Pet Ready for New Years Eve?

Emergency vet lost pet microchipped.jpg

Celebrating New Year’s Eve is a great tradition but it is one of our busiest nights for lost/stray pets.

Is Your Pet Ready for New Years Eve:
1. Have you microchipped your pet?
2. Are they wearing a collar ID tag?
3. Are your contact details are up-to-date with the National Pet Register?

By doing these 3 things it will give you and your pet the best chance of being reunited in the event they become lost.

***Important Numbers***
National Pet Register can be contacted 24/7 on 1300 734 738
Lost Dogs Home can be contacted (03) 9329 2755

 

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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**Snake Warning As Weather Warms Up in Melbourne** – Vet Care

Brown Snake

**Snake Warning As Weather Warms Up in Melbourne**

With the weather warming up, Snakes are now emerging from hibernation and becoming active.

If you are out walking your pets you should keep an eye on your dog and avoid walking in long grass.

The common signs of Snake bite include pets who suddenly start vomiting, having trouble walking, urinating blood, collapsing.

If you think that your pet may have been bitten, then you need to take them to your local vet or to one of our

24 hour Pet Emergency Centres as they need to be seen as soon as possible!!

 

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Chinaberry Tree Toxicity: Emergency Vet Care

This is the adorable Twiggy, a 7 month old Dachshund puppy who has received emergency veterinary care by Dr Jina Song for Chinaberry toxicity.

The Chinaberry tree is also know as White Cedar tree or “Melia Azedarach” and is highly toxic.

Twiggy presented at our Point Cook 24hr Pet Emergency Centre suffering an acute onset of vomiting.

Twiggy was most fortunate as her carers saw her eating the berries and rushed her to our centre. Her treatment was successful although she is continuing treatment due to expected complications from stomach insults from her ordeal.

The entire tree is toxic (bark, leaves and flowers) with higher toxin amounts in the berries.

Once eaten, your pet will quickly show varying signs:
– vomiting,
– tremors,
– seizures,
– diarrhoea,
– weakness,
– death (which can occur within 24 hours)

The fruit is highly toxic to animals and people, most likely causing death from kidney, liver failure and central nervous system problems.

If your pet ingests these berries please contact your veterinarian or one of our 24hr Pet Emergency Centres immediately.

Essendon Fields‬: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook‬: (03) 8368 7400

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Pet Safety Tips for Halloween – Emergency Vet Care

Emergency Vet Halloween Safety Pet Tips

In Australia, Halloween is getting bigger and bigger every year. With the cultural impact growing it’s a good idea to consider some safety issues for your pet.

**Trick-or-treat candies are not for pets
Chocolate in all forms, especially dark or baking chocolate can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Even non-chocolate candy is dangerous, as it may contain, xylitol, an artificial sweetener that can cause a sudden drop in blood sugar and seizures.

Maltese Terriers Halloween Vet Emergency Melbourne

**Take caution with your pet’s costume
Don’t dress your pet in a costume unless you know they’ll love it. Make sure it fits properly and is comfortable, doesn’t have any pieces that can easily be chewed off, and doesn’t interfere with your pet’s sight, hearing, breathing, opening its mouth, or moving.

**Don’t leave pets out in the yard on Halloween.
Dog and cat owners should consider keeping their pets in a secure location during the celebrations. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets. Loud excited kids dressed in unusual costumes can freak out pets. Dogs are especially territorial and may become anxious.

**Keep away from decorations
Keep lit candles out of reach of pets. Carved pumpkins or candles are very easily knocked over causing a fire hazard or burns.

**Make sure your pet has ID
There has been an increasing number of pets going missing on Halloween, ensure your pet has an identifying tag, engraved with your phone number. Having the proper identification will increase the chances that they will be returned.

If you have any pet safety concerns please call your local vet or one of 24-hour Pet Emergency Centres:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Day Light Savings starts tomorrow – Melbourne

Day Light Savings Melbourne

Day Light Savings Melbourne

 

Day Light Savings starts tomorrow Melbourne!

Please push your clock an hour forward.

ANIMAL ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY

We are OPEN 24 hours 7 days a week if your pet needs veterinary help.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

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Day Light Savings – Starts this SUNDAY Melbourne!

Day Light Savings

Day Light Savings

****REMINDER****

Day Light Savings will start this Sunday for Melbourne.

Please push your clock an hour forward.

Animal Accident & Emergency is OPEN 24 hours 7 days a week if your pet needs veterinary help.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

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GDV Burnese Mountain Dog – Animal Emergency Melbourne

Emergency GDV

Emergency  GDV

Georgy is a gorgeous Burnese Mountain Dog who presented to Animal Accident and Emergency Point Cook last week for severe abdominal pain, abdominal distension (bloated belly) and dry retching (attempting to vomit without producing any vomit).

This presentation and breed are typical of a disease commonly known as BLOAT. The technical name for bloat is “gastric dilation and volvulus” or “GDV” for short. 

In cases of GDV the stomach has become distended and has filled with gas and then twisted over on itself. This is a life threatening condition as all the blood vessels that supply the stomach get kinked off like a bent hose pipe and this stops the blood flow to the stomach wall. The stomach wall begins to die as a result of the lack of blood supply. The stomach then inflates further as gas cannot escape out of a twisted stomach. The inflating stomach blocks off blood that is returning to the heart via the large vessels in the abdomen. This causes shock. Another complication of the overly inflated stomach is that it puts pressure on the diaphragm (the muscle that makes you breath) thus making it very difficult for these poor doggies to breath!

Please see this link for an animation of what happens in GDV:

In summary, the main things that happen in a bloat case are: 

  • distended stomach twists and loses blood supply causing the stomach wall to start dying 
  • the distended stomach inflates even more and blocks off other blood vessels returning blood to the heart
  • the now very distended stomach puts pressure on the diaphragm and prevents the dog from being able to breath properly. 

So now that we all know about GDV and what happens, what can we do to correct it and save your beloved dog? 

The first thing to do is confirm the vets suspicion of GDV with a x-ray of the patient’s belly. This is exactly what we did for Georgy. If the vet suspects that your dog has GDV, you may be asked if we can take an x-ray immediately to check if that is indeed what is happening. 

GDV XRAY VET EMERGENCY

GDV XRAY VET EMERGENCY

Unfortunately, once the twisted stomach has been confirmed, the only way to fix what is happening is surgery. Before we get into what is done surgically to correct this condition we need to stabilise the dog first. Stabilisation involves deflating the stomach by either passing a tube down their throat or using a needle to let some gas out. Given that these patients are in shock fluids will need to be started immediately in order to help their heart and circulation. This condition is also painful and pain relief will be provided in this phase. 

The next step is surgery. Surgery involves anaesthetising the patient and an incision (cut) into the abdomen (belly). The stomach is untwisted and inspected carefully. Sometimes the stomach will be dead in places and these places will have to be removed because dead tissue cannot be left behind. The spleen (a blood storage organ) is closely attached to the stomach and sometimes this may have twisted with the stomach and may need to be removed as well- this may sounds like a big deal but dogs do just fine without their spleens. Once the stomach and spleen are dealt with, the stomach is then stitched to the abdominal wall to prevent it twisting over on itself again – this is called a GASTROPEXY and is a VERY IMPORTANT part of the surgery as this condition will recur if this is not done! 

The rest of the abdomen is inspected and then closed. 

RECOVERY

Recovery time for this surgery depends on a lot of different things. Minimum time in hospital after surgery is 24 hours but some patients may require a few days. The longer the stomach is twisted for before surgery is performed, the more complications are encountered and the longer the recovery period. 

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR?

  1. BREED IS THE NUMBER ONE CONSISTENT FACTOR IN BLOAT. Certain breeds are far more at risk than others. These breeds are the bigger breeds of dog and tend to have “deep proud chests”. Breeds most at risk: Great Dane, German Shepherds, Standard Poodles, Dobermans, Boxers, Dalmatians, Weimaraner, Burnese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards, Newfounlands, Labradors, Retrievers, Chow Chows and Rhodesian Ridgebacks. However OTHER DOGS CAN HAVE GDV. 
  2. Bloated belly 
  3. Trying to vomit (dry retching). Some dogs with bloat may be able to produce some vomit so do not exclude bloat on the basis that your dog can vomit. A vomiting pet is always a concern and you should always seek veterinary advice if your pet is vomiting or trying to vomit. 
  4. Sore belly- standing hunched, whining or yelping.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU THINK YOUR PET HAS BLOAT? 

Contact a vet immediately. As mentioned before, time is of the essence in both saving your dog and in minimising complications. AAE Essendon and Point Cook are open 24 hours a day 365 days of the year. 

HOW CAN YOU PREVENT GDV?

  1. If your dog is an at-risk breed for GDV (see breeds above) there is the option to consult your general practice vet about prophylactic gastropexy (a surgery where they stitch the stomach to the abdominal wall before the GDV has occurred). This is the ONLY way to prevent your dogs stomach from twisting. This surgery is especially easy to do in females when they are spayed as puppies as the vet is already entering the abdomen and saves a separate anaesthesia and surgery. 
  2. If you have an at-risk breed of GDV (see breeds above), it is recommended to feed your dog smaller meals more frequently as opposed to one large meal. 
  3. It has long been thought that exercising your dog immediately after feeding may increase the risk of bloat. It is recommended that you avoid exercising your dog soon after you have fed them. 

DISPELLING THE MYTHS

  • Feeding your dog antacids or de-gas medication does not decrease the risk of the development of GDV
  • If your dog has a twisted stomach, surgery is the ONLY option in order to save your dog’s life, without the appropriate surgery THE VAST MAJORITY OF THESE DOGS WILL TWIST THEIR STOMACHS AGAIN!
Dr Tim Conolly & Georgy

Dr Tim Conolly & Georgy

We are happy to say that the lovely Georgy made a full recovery from her GDV and subsequent surgery with very few complications. 

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Animal Accident & Emergency 24 Hour Vet Care Melbourne

24 Hour Vet Care Melbourne

24 Hour Vet Care Melbourne

Animal Accident & Emergency has two 24 Hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne.

Our Pet Emergency departments are OPEN 365 days, providing 24 Hour Critical Care.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

 

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I131 Radioactive Iodine Therapy – Hyperthyroidism in Cats

Vixen Cat radioative treatment Pet Emergency Melbourne

Look at those gorgeous amber eyes!

Vixen is a 15 year old long hair domestic cat who has just checked in at Animal Accident & Emergency  for I131 Radioactive Iodine Therapy.

I131 Radioactive Iodine Therapy is for the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats.

Vixen has been referred to us by Fitzroy Veterinary Hospital and will be under the care of Dr Linda Abraham while under going treatment.

I131 Radioactive Iodine Therapy
http://www.animalemergency.com.au/i131-cat-hyperthyroid-tre…

 

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We do not recommend Rabbits and Guinea Pigs together – Melbourne Vet advice

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic

Guinea Pigs and Rabbits should not be put together

We do not recommend rabbits and guinea pigs together for the following reasons:

  • Rabbits may hog the food
  • Rabbits may bully the guinea pigs.
  • Guinea pigs can cause severe eye injuries to rabbits.
  • Rabbits carry a bacteria Bordetella that is lethal to guinea pigs
  • They require different feeding regimes
  • Rabbits talk ‘rabbit’ with rabbits and guinea pigs talk ‘pig’ with guinea pigs.

Guinea pigs rarely cohabit well with other species. If you have indoor dogs and cats you need to a secure enclosure.

The Melbourne Rabbit Clinic is the first and only hospital in Australia to treat rabbits and guinea pigs exclusively.

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic have an absolute passion for rabbits and guinea pigs offering high quality veterinary care especially tailored for Rabbits and Guinea Pigs.

Melbourne Rabbit Clinic is consulting at Animal Accident & Emergency our 24 hour Vet Emergency Centres – Essendon Fields & Point Cook

To book an appointment please ring the Melbourne Rabbit Clinic directly on (03) 9758 9879.

For more information please visit our website: www.animalemergency.com.au

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24 Hour Emergency Vet Melbourne

24 Hour Emergency Vet Melbourne

If you require a 24-hour emergency vet in Melbourne please contact one of our two Pet Emergency Centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Our 24-hour emergency vet centres CARE for injured or sick pets anytime of the day. An emergency veterinary clinic is not the same as most vet clinics. Our aim is to work with your personal Vet to provide the best possible vet CARE for your pet.

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Emergency Veterinary Nursing Positions – Melbourne

 

NURSES

Full Time & Casual Emergency Veterinary Nursing Positions

Animal Accident & Emergency would like to announce that we now have a full time nursing position and casual positions available.  We are looking for people who are excited by emergency nursing and are looking for a challenge.  These positions would ideally suit an experienced nurse. 

Animal Accident & Emergency operates on a 24 hour basis and employment is shift based.  Shifts are scheduled to include night, day and weekend work.  This would be a great opportunity for those looking at completing a Diploma in Veterinary Nursing. Successful applicants will be required to work at both our locations, Point Cook and Essendon Fields.

Applications will close on Friday 5 June 2014.  The positions available are for immediate start.  Please send a résumé including a referee list to jobs@animalemergency.com.au .  Attention your application to HealthCare Team Manager and advise which position you are applying for.

Please note that this is not a training a position. Applicants must have as a minimum a Cert IV in Veterinary Nursing. All applicants will be contacted after the application close date.

For more information please visit our website: www.animalemergency.com.au

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Permethrin toxicity in cats

Vet Emergency Permethrin toxicity in cats

A common cause of toxicity in cats presented to emergency vet clinics is the application and/or accidental exposure to canine insecticide and flea products containing the active ingredient permethrin.

Permethrin is part of the “pyrethroid“ class of toxins which affect the central nervous system. As a general rule, any product containing pyrethroids should not be used in cats as they are very sensitive to these toxins.

Clinical signs usually occur within hours of exposure and affected cats can exhibit signs of seizures, muscle tremors, shaking, drooling and vomiting. Affected patients require emergency vet care to control and treat seizures and muscle tremors.

If you have any concerns about your cat having come into contact with permethrin or pyrethroid containing products then do not hesitate to contact your local animal emergency hospital.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

 

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Keep Your Cat Safe – Lily Flower Toxicity in Cats

 

 

 

 

Emergency Vet Melbourne Cat Lily Flower Toxicity

With Mothers Day approaching this weekend, we thought it was important to write about Lily Flower Toxicity in Cats.

Lily flowers are toxic for cats and can cause death. Toxicities in pets are a common cause of vet emergency. Lily toxicity is seen most often during holidays and on special occasions such as Valentine’s day and Mother’s day when flower bouquets are given as gifts.

Rubrum lily Tiger Lily Easter Lily

Many lily species are toxic to felines and can include, but not limited to:
• Easter lily
• Tiger lilyR
• Rubrum lily
• Stargazer Lily
• Japanese show lily
• Red lily
• Western lily
• Wood lily
• Day lily

All parts of the plant are toxic and a small amount, even 1-2 leaves, can be lethal. Toxicity can cause kidney failure, vomiting, diarrhea and seizures.

If your cat potentially ingested lily’s prompt and early intervention often leads to a good prognosis, however once clinical signs develop and progress then it may be too late to reverse the damage done.

If you have any concern about your cat ingesting Lilies you should contacting your local vet or 24 hour pet hospital immediately as lily ingestion is an animal emergency.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Vet open Good Friday, Easter Sunday & Easter Monday

Vet Open Easter Holidays

Animal Accident & Emergency

will be OPEN 24/7 during the Easter Holiday period.

Our Pet Emergency Centres are always open as we never close even on public holidays.

If you need a vet on Good Friday, Easter Sunday or Easter Monday

then please contact one of our 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne:

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Our Emergency Vet Department – Melbourne

intensive care

Along with being able to deal with any animal emergency, Animal Accident & Emergency also houses a critical care unit. This is complementary to our 24 hour vetMelbourne pets requiring intensive care have access to experienced care around the clock.

Critically ill patients have access to central venous pressure monitoring, positive pressure ventilation or respirators, enteral feeding and parenteral feeding catheters and more.

Critically ill animals will likely need the assistance of a team of doctors.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

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Happy Labour Day – Pet Emergency Centres

Hope you relax this labor day

 

Happy Labour Day from the staff at AAE

Pet Emergency Centre Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Pet Emergency Centre Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

OPEN 24/7 including public holidays

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Happy Labour Day from Animal Accident & Emergency Melbourne

Happy Labour Day from Animal Accident Emergency Melbourne

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN Labour Day!

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN 24/7 over the long Labour Day weekend.

We have two Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne which will be OPEN 24 hours on Labour Day.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700 Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Happy Labour Day!

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Melbourne Vet OPEN Labour Day 2015!

OPENING HOURS FOR  LABOUR DAY WEEKEND

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN 24/7 over the long Labour Day weekend.

We have two Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne which will be OPEN 24 hours on Labour Day.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700 Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Happy Labour Day!

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Southpaws is Now Operating in Point Cook

 

southpaws specialty surgery for animals at Point Cook

Southpaws is excited to announce that we are now seeing cases and performing surgery at Animal Accident and Emergency in Point Cook.

Dr Charles Kuntz surgery at Animal Accident & Emergency Point Cook

Dr. Charles Kuntz is consulting on Friday mornings and operating on Friday afternoons.

AAE Point Cook is equipped with a new pencil cone CT scanner which provides excellent image quality with minimal radiation exposure. All types of surgical procedures including oncologic surgery, neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery (including arthroscopy) and soft tissue surgery will be offered at Point Cook.

Please call Southpaws on (03) 9553 1775 to book appointments. Email info@southpaws.com.au if you have questions.

As always Southpaws surgical consultations at Animal Accident & Emergency Point Cook are free-of-charge

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Kitty Treated with Radioactive Iodine- I131 Therapy

I131 Cat Therapy Dr Linda Abraham

It’s time for a shout out to one of our patients!

Kitty is a very cuddly cat who has been under the care of Dr Linda Abraham for the last week. Kitty was referred from Altona Veterinary Clinic for treatment of an over active thyroid.

Kitty is one of the many cats that Dr Linda has treated with radioactive Iodine (i131) for Feline Hyperthyroidism. For most cats that are treated, their over active thyroid returns to normal and they loose the need for daily medication. Removing the need for daily medication greatly improves the health and well being for the pet and owner.

Animal Accident & Emergency Point Cook, is one of limited facilities in Australia that are licenced to perform treatment for cats. We perform the service weekly and are happy to discuss options for therapy with you.

Kitty will be discharged today.

For more information on I131 cat treatment click on the following link: I131 Radioactive Iodine Therapy

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Have you Lost your PET?

Animal Accident & Emergency have a created a page for local lost pets within Melbourne.

What to do when you loose your pet:

  • Walk or drive through your neighbourhood several times each day.
  • Ask your neighbours
  • Post a note on a your local BSS Facebook page
  • Contact local animal shelters and animal control agencies.
  • Contact local vet’s and 24 hour Pet Emergency Centres

For a list of local Animal shelters and Council number click on the attached link:

http://www.animalemergency.com.au/lost-pets.html

 

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36 degrees today & tomorrow – Keep your Pets Cool

dog and ice
Tips to avoid heat stress/stroke:
  • Provide a cool  shaded area
  • Provide plenty of clean fresh water and extra water sources in case of spillage.
  • Bring animals indoors on hot, with the air-conditioning or fan on.
  • Do not exercise animals in hot weather conditions. Walk your dog very early in the morning or very late in the afternoon and avoid the hottest part of the day.
  • Do not leave your dog in a vehicle – even when the windows are down dogs can still overheat and die.

 

If you think your pet is suffering from heat stroke, please call Animal Accident & Emergency or contact your local vet without delay.

 

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Melbourne Vet OPEN Australia Day 2015!

Australia day 2015

OPENING HOURS FOR  AUSTRALIA DAY WEEKEND

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN 24/7 over the long Australia Day weekend.

We have two Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne which will be OPEN 24 hours on Australia Day.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Happy Australia Day!

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Animal Accident & Emergency would like to introduce an Australian first: CT Scanner

Fidex CT Scanner available at Animal Accident & Emergency

An Australian First – Fidex CT Scanner

Animal Accident & Emergency would like to introduce an Australian first.  In December, AAE installed a CT scanner in our Point Cook 24Hr Emergency Centre.  The CT unit by Fidex is a major advancement in technology and unique in many ways.  Traditional CT units are common place in human and pet medicine.  They work by taking several hundred radiographs and then using computer programs to “join” the images together.  This allows the Doctor to look at body organs and structures in much more detail.

The new unit now operating at Animal Accident & Emergency uses the latest technology to combine a traditional style CT unit with an X-Ray unit and Fluoroscopy.  The combination allows us to combined three different devices into one unit.

At present you would need three different units to perform a CT, an X-Ray or a Fluoroscopic study.  The Fidex combines the functionality of the three different machines into one user friendly unit.  One of the functions we love is seeing the images in a 3D perspective.  It helps the pet owner visualise the problem that their pet has.  We can even strip back tissue layers which is great for planning for complex cancer surgeries.

3D Image 3D Image CT Scanner Emergency Vet Care 1

The Fidex unit has some major benefits to patients.  It is able top generate X -Ray images using minimal doses of radiation.  This means that we can take radiographs or perform a CT and the amount of radiation that the patient experience is far less.  It also increases the safety for the Vet Team. 

The unit itself is environmentally friendly.  Traditional CT units require substantial amounts electricity to operate.  They require a specialised air-conditioning plant to prevent them from overheating.  Our Fidex uses minimal electricity, runs in any standard air-conditioned building and plugs directly into a normal PowerPoint.  This also dramatically reduces the running costs of the unit which means savings for pet owners.

The unit is small, compact but mighty and we were able to install it in a standard sized room.

Our Fidex unit is the first in Australia and is truly a unique installation.  The ease of use, lower radiation emission and speed of the unit means that we can provide sick pets with advanced imaging at a cost effective price.  It provides more options then currently available at most veterinary centres.

Our specialists and Emergency team are using the Fidex for a variety of sick pet conditions.  With trauma and road accidents, we can scan for internal bleeding as well as bone fractures.  Our Medicine Specialist Dr Linda Abraham is able to perform cancer scans which help identify forms of cancer within the body.  

The following are some of the used of the unit:

  • Traditional X-Rays
  • Looking at specific organ structure such as the lungs, kidney, liver, spleen, urinary bladder
  • Used to help identify spinal problems
  • Diseases of the nose
  • Brain Tumours
  • Head trauma
  • Collapsing airways
  • Angiography for heart disease
  • Liver shunt identification
  • Swallowing studies for oesophageal or gastric motility problems
  • Elbow, knee and hip orthopaedic problems

To view the Fidex unit in action click on the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJQE1ZBkzvQ

For more information contact our 24hr Pet Emergency Centre: (03) 8368 7400

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Tips to Keep Your Pets Cool in Summer

dog on ice

Tips to Keep Your Pets Cool in Summer

  1. Put our extra bowls of water in case one is accidentally tipped over.
  2. Ice cubes in water bowls.
  3. Use shade cloths or outdoor umbrellas to create extra shade.
  4. Takeaway containers filled with beef/chicken stock, frozen overnight and given to outdoor animals.
  5. Paddling pools filled with water.
  6. Walk your dog in the early morning or late evening to avoid the heat of the day.
  7. Let your outdoor animals come inside and share the air conditioning.

 

Know the Signs of Heat Stress:

  • Panting
  • Restlessness
  • Dehydration
  • Excessive drooling
  • Gum colour may become brick red, then purple or blue
  • Increased body temperature
  • Distress breathing
  • Increased heart rate
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Black, tarry stools
  • Mental status changes
  • Muscle tremors
  • Wobbly, weakness, staggering, unable to walk
  • Seizures,
  • Coma
  • Death

If you think your pet is suffering from heat stroke, please call Animal Accident & Emergency or contact your local vet without delay.

 

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

 

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Vet Open New Years Day Melbourne

Happy New Year Vet Open new years day Melbourne
OPENING HOURS OVER THE NEW YEARS PERIOD

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN 24/7 during the New Year period should you need us.

WE NEVER CLOSE

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Wishing you and your fur babies a very Happy New Year.

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Animal Accident Emergency Open Christmas & New Year Day

Christmas pic Vet Open Christmas DAy

Vet Open Xmas Day Melbourne

OPENING HOURS OVER CHRISTMAS & NEW YEARS

Animal Accident & Emergency will be OPEN 24/7 during the Christmas and the New Year period should you need us.

WE NEVER CLOSE

Please call one of our Pet Emergency Centres:
Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Wishing you and your fur babies a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

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Tips on how to keep your Pet Safe Over Christmas – Christmas Decorations

merry christmas dogs

Here’s how to keep your pet safe and healthy over the festive season:

Christmas decorations, Tinsel & flashing lights
Dogs & Cat’s love tinsel, bubbles, flashing lights they see it as a “toy” to play with or carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow and hence lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery.

Safety tips for pets:

  • make sure your Christmas tree is safely secured to the ground and cannot easily topple.
  • put decorations up high where your pets can’t get them.
  • use a mixture of lemon or orange extract and water in a spray bottle. (Most cats and dogs do not like citrus and will avoid).
  • edible treats  on  your  Christmas tree such as candy canes or chocolate may be attractive to your pet and harmful if consumed.

In the event of an emergency on Christmas Day, call AAE After Hours Emergency Veterinary Hospital on:

(03) 9379 0700 Essendon Fields

(03) 8368 7400 Point Cook

 

Animal Accident & Emergency is open 24 hours 7 days a week, Melbourne Pet Emergency Centre.

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Veterinary Emergency: Paraphimosis (Prolapsed penis)

 

Alfred Vet Emergency Paraphimosis

Alfred was admitted to our Pet Emergency Centre for Paraphimosis (Prolapsed penis). Paraphimosis is the inability to retract the erect penis back into a normal position – into the preputial sheath.

Alfred’s owners had attempted to manually  fix the problem but with no success.

When Alfred arrived at our Essendon Pet Emergency Centre his prolapsed penis was very swollen/inflamed that our emergency vets needed to place Alfred under a general anaesthetic.

Causes of this condition can be from excess licking, sexual excitement or foreign bodies getting up under the skin(hair) and trauma.

If the swelling does not resolve within 30 minutes then immediate veterinary treatment is required due to tissue damage and urethral obstruction. In some cases the tissue of the penis dies off due to lack of blood supply and the dog requires a partial penis amputation.

In Alfred’s case our emergency vets had been able to replace his penis back into it’s normal position. He is a very sweet 5 month old Basset Hound puppy and the staff at AAE wish Alfred a speedy recovery.

If you have a pet emergency please contact one of Animal Hospitals located in Melbourne:
Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400
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Intensive Care from a 24 Hour Vet in Melbourne

Intensive care from a 24 hour vet in Melbourne

  

Along with being able to deal with any animal emergency 24/7, Animal Accident & Emergency also houses a critical care unit at our Animal Hospitals. This is complementary to our Melbourne pets requiring intensive care, they have access to experienced care around the clock. 

Critically ill patients have access to central venous pressure monitoring, positive pressure ventilation or respirators, enteral feeding and parenteral feeding catheters and more.

Critically ill animals will likely need the assistance of a team of emergency specialist vets.

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Full Time Emergency & Critical Care Veterinarian

nursing assistant

Animal Accident & Emergency is seeking applicants for a full time emergency and critical care veterinarian. Our hospitals are purpose-built 24-hour emergency, critical care and referral facilities, with the latest up-to-date equipment. We have everything you will need to provide the best standard of care including multi-parameter patient monitors, in-house laboratory, ultrasound, endoscopy, digital radiography, mechanical ventilation, CT and fluoroscopy. The position will involve shift work at both our Essendon and Point Cook centres and would suit applicants looking to further their career within emergency and critical care.

 

The ideal candidate will possess the following:

  • A minimum of 2 years experience as a Veterinarian with a keen interest and/or background in emergency medicine
  • Commitment to continuing education and willingness to learn
  • Exceptional written and verbal communication skill
  • Ability to work efficiently, independently and as part of the team
  • Commitment for exceptional patient care

Our successful candidate will have access to the following:

  • Ability for career advancement
  • Structured internal training and clinical mentoring programs
  • External continuing education
  • Access to a great team of veterinarians and nurses
  • Support from Registered Specialists, Registrars and Residents in Emergency and Critical Care
  • Support from Registered Specialist in Internal Medicine.

Employment is shift based, with rotations involving day, night, weekend and public holiday shifts.

The standard working week is 37.5 hrs.If you are interested in working with a great team with plenty of support and challenging and rewarding cases, please send your application to jobs@animalemergency.com.au

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24 hour Vet CARE Specialists

vet pic 9

Animal Accident and Emergency (AAE) is a purpose-built animal emergency centre servicing Melbourne.  It provides 24hr animal emergency services.  There are two great locations – Essendon and Point Cook. 

Our Melbourne Vet Emergency Centres provide dedicated emergency care 24/7.  We are not just an after hours vet clinic.  Our whole focus is emergency and critical care.

If you require treatment for an animal emergency, Melbourne’s AAE offers:

  • 24 hour emergency service Critical care and after hours vet emergency care
  • Experience in veterinary emergencies
  • Up-to-date equipment and purpose-built surgery
  • 24 hour veterinarians
Crisis Care Specialists
Our services extend far beyond what would normally be expected of an after hours vet.  Our equipment and training allow us to provide an exceptional level of patient care.
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Tail Pull injury’s are commonly caused by cars running over a Cat’s Tail

Rufus Burmese Cat Emergency Vet Melbourne

Rufus is a 9 month old Choc Point Burmese cat who presented to Animal Accident & Emergency as a referral from his regular vet for ongoing care after being diagnosed with a tail pull injury.

What is a Tail Pull Injury:
It is a common injury caused when a car runs over the cat’s tail pulling apart the sacral-lumbar or coccygeal vertebrae and stretching the nerves that go to the bladder, rectum, and tail.

Signs: Tail hangs loosely – paralysed tail, urinary and/or faecal incontinence to partial loss of sciatic nerve function.

Treatment: Cats will need to be seen by a vet and hospitalised so the bladder can be manually emptied and receive treatment to attempt to heal the nerves controlling the urination and defecation. The tail may need to be amputated.

All spinal cord injuries require immediate veterinary attention. Protect the cat’s spine and use a blanket or towel to lift the cat onto a flat surface like a board before transporting to the vet.

Rufus is currently receiving critical care at our Essendon Pet Emergency Centre, the staff at AAE wish Rufus a speedy recovery.

Pictured above: Rufus enjoying a neck rub from Dr Nicole Trigg after his morning examination.

Rufus Burmese Cat Pet Emergency Centre Melbourne

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Melbourne Cup Opening Hours – Emergency Vet

Melbourne Cup Dog

Animal Accident & Emergency will be open on Melbourne Cup Day.

You can contact our Pet Emergency Centres 24 hours, 7 days a week as we never close.

Our Animal Hospitals provide 24hr animal emergency at two great locations – Essendon and Point Cook. The centres are located to provide direct and easy freeway access. Time is precious in any emergency.

Our Emergency Centres provide dedicated emergency care. We are not just an after hours vet clinic.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

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Halloween can be a lot of fun for you and your pets.

Halloween dogs pet emergency

Halloween can be a lot of fun for you and your pets.

Just be careful and make sure your #pet’s #safety is in mind, here are some tips:

Costumes: If you want to dress your pet up for Halloween, that’s great but only if your pet doesn’t mind it as some animals can become very anxious. Make sure any costumes you put on your pets doesn’t constrict them and they are able to bark/meow and move freely.

Candy: Chocolate can be poisonous to dogs and cats and lots of sugar is bad for their digestion.

Trick-or-Treating: If you’re opening up your home to trick-or-treaters pets can be scared of kids in costumes so it’s better to have them in a safe place. Some might actually run out the door, so please be sure they have their ID tags on and are microchipped.

Happy Halloween for those celebrating today!!!

Animal Accident & Emergency: 24hour Pet Emergency Centre

http://www.animalemergency.com.au

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Pet CARE: Heat Stroke is a serious Pet Emergency

 

animal emergency dog drinking water
We do see heat related diseases at our 24 Hour Pet Emergency Centres in Melbourne.Heat stroke is serious and is commonly seen in dogs. Heat stroke, is when the body temperature reaches above > 39.5°C. Dogs may die if their body temperature reaches > 41.7°C.As an emergency critical care specialist centre, we see heat stoke due to:

1. Locking a dog in a car, even if the car windows are open it is too dangerous.
2. Exercising with a dog when there is excessive heat and humidity
3. Leaving your outdoor dog in the sweltering heat without adequate water or shelter/shade.

Some signs of heat stroke:
-Constant panting
-Dry gums that feel sticky to the touch
-Dark red gums
-Vomiting
-Wobbly
-Seizures
-Dark coloured urine
-Diarrhoea
-Difficulty breathing
-Collapse

If your pet is suffering from a heat stroke, then we need to see your pet as soon as possible.
• Cool them down with fans and water
• Phone us
• Drive to our emergency centres as safe as possible.

Essendon Fields: (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook: (03) 8368 7400

www.animalemergency.com.au

 

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Great Dan Eats 43 Socks!

 

dog eats 43 socks

http://www.wave3.com/story/26442557/oregon-dog-eats-43-socks-vets-remove-every-single-one?clienttype=generic&mobilecgbypass

As all dog owners know, our dogs love to chew anything and everything. When they are puppies, it seems as if chewing toys, bones, socks or anything around the house is just a normal occurrence. However, sometimes our puppies and/or older dogs swallow something that just doesn’t go down as it should and can be potentially dangerous. It’s important to find out immediately what your dog has ingested.

Signs that your dog might have swallowed a something foreign

  • Sudden onset of choking that affects your dog’s breathing should be dealt with urgently.
  • Signs of intestinal or digestive discomfort
  • Vomiting and possibly diarrhea

You should next try to find out what toy or parts of a toy are and items are still around. You can then figure out what your poor dog might have swallowed to give your veterinarian a point of reference.

 

Your dog is choking – Pet Emergency

If your dog is choking on something, the best thing you can do is try to help your dog immediately. Choking for big dogs and small dogs are handled differently. Just as in humans, the goal is to get it out of your dog’s system immediately.

If you believe that your pet may have swallowed a bone or toy, then you need to contact us directly. We have two convenient emergency centers. Our Emergency Centres run 24Hr Intensive Care Units.

Animal Accident & Emergency – Essendon Fields 9379 0700

Animal Accident & Emergency – Point Cook  8368 7400

 

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Pet First Aid Workshop in Melbourne

Pet First Aid WorkShop

Pet First Aid WorkShop

Animal Accident & Emergency is running a 3 hour Pet First Aid workshop course in Melbourne on:

*Sunday 3rd August 2014 from 9am – 12pm
*Sunday 17th August 2014 from 9am – 12pm

This course is open to the public and recommended especially for those who work with pets – foster carers, pet sitters, rescue workers etc

The course will cover common emergencies and first aid:

– CPR – practice on a dog mannequin

– Rescue breaths

– Bleeding

– Bandaging

– Shock

– Choking

– Bites & stings

– Burns

– Eye injuries

– Ear injuries

– Nose injuries

– Broken bones

– Sprains

– Heat stress

– Seizures

– Poisoning/toxicities


To enroll or for more information please click on the link below: http://www.petemergencystore.com.au/Pet First Aid Course

 

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24 hour Animal Hospital Melbourne

24 hour Animal Hospital Melbourne providing Critical care and after hours vet emergency care.

There are two Pet Emergency Centres located in – Essendon and Point Cook. The centres are located to provide direct and easy freeway access. Time is precious in any emergency.

Our Emergency Centres provide dedicated emergency care. We are not just an after hours vet clinic. Our whole focus is emergency and critical care.

Whether your pet is admitted simply for an after hours vet check up or to our 24 hour Animal Hospital in Melbourne we will work together with your regular vet to manage ongoing care and progress checks.

ESSENDON PET EMERGENCY CENTRE (03) 9379 0700

POINT COOK PET EMERGENCY CENTRE (03) 8368 7400

 

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Von Willebrand’s Disease – The Inherited Bleeding Disorder

 All 4 dogs picture blog

Von Willebrand’s disease is a genetic bleeding disorder that is found in all breeds of dogs, but more commonly in certain breeds, such as Dobermans, Rottweilers, Scottish Terriers, German Shepherds and German Short Haired pointers. It is caused by a deficiency in a specific blood clotting factor that helps platelets to bind broken blood vessels and start to form a blood clot. Without veterinary treatment, von Willebrand’s disease can be life threatening when the pet’s body needs to deal with any form of internal or external bleeding. When this blood clotting factor deficiency is present (known as the von Willebrand factor), even a small injury can lead to excessive blood loss and potentially anaemia, as the blood is unable to clot normally.

While the specific clinical signs for von Willebrand’s disease aren’t always obvious for pet owners to spot, any sign of excessive bleeding should be treated as an animal emergency and the pet needs to be taken to a 24 hour vet clinic immediately. Also, while pets are born with this disease present in their body, they may not show any effects of the bleeding disorder until later in life when they have a surgery or injury that causes bleeding.

The most common clinical signs that may be seen are:

  • Excessive bleeding from injuries/lacerations
  • Sudden bleeding from the nose, gums or vagina
  • Blood present in urine
  • Excessive bleeding after females give birth
  • Prolonged bleeding after veterinary procedures/surgery

When veterinarians suspect that pets may have von Willebrand’s disease, the most common diagnostic test performed is the buccal mucosal bleeding time. This tests how well blood clotting platelets are working by by making a small incision in the pet’s gum and timing how long it takes for the bleeding to stop. Blood tests are also used to check how much of the von Willebrand’s factor is present in the blood.

When the disease becomes an emergency situation, 24hr emergency vets will often need to use plasma transfusions to stabilise the pet and return clotting factors to the bloodstream. Blood transfusions may also be required if there has been significant blood loss. After transfusions, animals will generally need to remain in a 24 hour pet hospital for ongoing monitoring and care, as well as potentially more transfusions.

There is unfortunately no cure for von Willebrand’s disease. However, it is still highly important to know if the disease is present in pets, especially Dobermans (as they are particularly prone to the disease), as this is crucial information if pets ever require surgery or if any sudden injuries occur. Owners of pets with von Willebrand’s disease can also help to prevent any excessive bleeding crisis’ from happening by avoiding high levels of stress and particular medications when possible, as these can worsen the effects of the disorder. While von Willebrand’s disease cannot be cured, most pets with this condition can still go on to lead long, happy and completely normal lives with the appropriate veterinary care.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook – both with easy freeway access and ample parking. Our animal hospitals are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating every vet emergency from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that they will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be have von Willebrand’s disease, or for any veterinarian emergency, please phone one of our 24 hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We’re Always Open, Always Care

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Radio-iodine treatment for feline hyperthyroidism

Hypertyroidism Animal Accident & Emergency

What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is a common condition of older cats resulting from excessive amounts thyroid hormone in the blood stream.  The majority of cats will have a benign thyroid tumour causing this condition but some may have a thyroid cancer.  The excessive thyroid hormone in the body speeds up the metabolic rate resulting in the common clinical signs of weight loss, increased appetite and thirst, increased activity and excitability, vomiting and diarrhoea.  A large thyroid gland, increased heart rate, presence of a heart murmur and increased blood pressure may be reported from the physical examination.  The diagnosis is usually made by means of a blood test although sometimes additional testing is required.

 

How can it be treated?

There are three methods of treatment in Australia: daily medical treatment at home for life, radio-iodine therapy or surgery.  Daily medical treatment will be suitable for some cats but it will not cure the condition and periodic examinations together with blood tests will be required to monitor the cat whilst it is being medicated.  Some cats may not be able to tolerate the drugs used to prevent thyroid hormone production due to side effects and other treatment options will be recommended instead.  Radio-iodine is a simple, effective (over 95% of cats treated will have normal thyroid function after a single treatment) and usually single treatment.  Whilst administration of radio-iodine does require sedation and hospitalisation (at a special licenced facility to allow the radiation to decay), the risk associated with this treatment is low.  Hyperthyroidism may alternatively be treated by surgery to remove the affected thyroid gland (thyroidectomy).  This will require a general anaesthetic and there can be complications following the surgery.

Each cat treated with radio-iodine (or thyroidectomy) will need to be assessed for the presence of other illnesses before the treatment goes ahead.  This is to make sure that there will not be any complications either during the administration of radio-iodine, during surgery or later when the thyroid hormone has decreased to normal.  Both radio-iodine therapy and thyroidectomy provide a non-reversible treatment and one consequence of reducing the thyroid hormone to normal in the blood stream is that for some cats kidney disease may become unmasked by this process.  Those cats which will suffer kidney disease when their hyperthyroidism is treated cannot be predicted from initial blood and urine tests.  This is why many veterinarians will suggest a medical treatment trial (where possible) to reduce the thyroid hormone to normal.  When the thyroid hormone has reduced to normal, blood and urine tests are used to assess how well the kidneys are working.  If the kidneys are not working properly, recommendations will be made depending on the severity of the decreased function.  For some cats this may mean that radio-iodine and surgery are not recommended.  Alternatively, it may mean that the radio-iodine treatment or surgery is postponed while the medication is continued and the kidney function is regularly checked.

 

What will happen to my cat during the treatment?

Typically, our cats will be admitted on a Monday (before 12 noon) for treatment the following day.  Food is taken out of the cage later in the evening and water is left for the cats to drink overnight.  Sedation is given on the Tuesday to administer the radio-iodine capsule by mouth.  Even if your cat is good at taking medications, sedation will be used to reduce the risk of radiation spillage should the cat not swallow the capsule.  There are strict laws that govern the handling of radiation in Australia.  Administration of the capsule is done in a designated area of our hospital where our patients are then housed during their stay.  Their body is scanned by a Geiger counter to ensure that the capsule has been swallowed properly.  The radiation needs to reduce (decay) to a certain amount and this will usually take a week.  Owners are not able to visit their cats whilst hospitalised due to radiation safety regulations.  During this period, the cats are observed frequently and fed twice daily.  Whilst we provide high quality cat food, some cats may become fussy eaters away from home and we encourage owners to provide a small supply of their favourite food so that their cat may be tempted to eat if they do not enjoy the food offered.  Similarly, we provide bedding but if bedding is provided from home it cannot be returned.

 

What do I need to do when my cat returns home?

There will be some residual radiation in the cat’s body and prolonged close contact should be avoided for the first week that the cat is home.  This means that your cat may not sleep on the bed with anyone at night or on their laps or be held for periods that exceed 30 minutes per day.  Any pregnant women or children should not have any contact with the cat for the first week that it is home.

The radiation does not work immediately and you may not notice too much difference in your cat’s health at first when they return home.  The radiation continues to works it effect over the next weeks to months and we therefore suggest that a blood sample is collected one month after treatment to assess the response.  This may be taken at our clinic or by your referring veterinarian.

If you are concerned regarding your cats health once home, please do not hesitate to contact our clinic.

 

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

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24 hour Vet Clinic Open Queens Birthday long weekend – Melbourne

 

Queensbirthday

We are OPEN on the

Queens Birthday Public Holiday

Public Holiday Consult fee is $170

(Effective from 8pm Sunday 8th June 2014)

If you have concerns or you are looking for a vet that is now open, please phone one of our Pet Emergency Centre:

Essendon Fields 9379 0700
Point Cook 8368 7400

Our Vet Clinics are Always Open, We always CARE

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Animal Accident & Emergency is seeking a full time Veterinarian

NURSES

Animal Accident & Emergency is seeking applications for a full time veterinarian. We are seeking applicants with experience in emergency and critical care. Animal Accident & Emergency operates 24/7 at two locations. The position will involve shift work at both emergency centres. Our centres are fully equipped and would suit applicants looking to further their career within emergency and critical care. You should be motivated, communicate well and have the ability to teamwork. You must also display a commitment to continuing education and willingness to learn.
We believe in a team approach with a supportive environment. Our Medical Director is a Registered Specialist in Emergency and Critical Care.
The ideal applicant would have Membership in emergency (ANZCVSc) or preparing to sit for membership within the next 12 months. Applicants with less experience will be considered. Employment is shift based, with rotations involving day, night, weekend and public holiday shifts. The average working week is 37.5 hrs.

Please send applications to jobs@animalemergency.com.au Applications will close on the 27th June 2014.

 

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Is your Pet a DRUG USER?

DIPScan

Toxicities are one of the more common presenting problems we see in the emergency room at Animal Accident and Emergency (AAE). Although it can be embarrassing for owners to admit, this includes accidental ingestion of illicit drugs.

There are some common symptoms that can be associated with different drug exposures; however, it is always reassuring to have a quantitative answer. There are many time where owners have no idea that their pet has found something they shouldn’t have.
Earlier this week, our emergency team were presented with a pet who was mentally altered and starting to have fits or seizures. There was no long term medical problems and the signs had developed rapidly. Given the type of signs, we asked the clients regarding access to some recreational drugs. While they were sure that their pet could not have been exposed, we ran a DIPSCAN test to be sure. The DIPSCAN was positive for a number of drugs. One being Diazepam which was given by the emergency team during stabilisation of the seizures. In this case, exposure was linked to a party held a week before hand.

Other times where the test has helped us out is when pets scavenge stuff from parks or laneways around houses. Again, owners are often unaware of what their pet has ingested. Identification is important as it can change the way we treat your pet in an emergency. Knowing what drugs your pet has ingested, can be save its life.

DIPSCAN is an in-house, diagnostic tool commonly utilised at AAE when there has been a suspected exposure to illicit drugs. By processing a urine sample we are able to identify trace amounts of illicit drugs such as: marijuana, opioids (e.g. heroin, morphine), cocaine, amphetamines, methyl-amphetamines and benzodiazepines (e.g. diazepam). Attached is a photo of a DIPSCAN test. To read the test, you look to see the windows where there is only one line.
This test can be extremely valuable when trying to structure treatment plans, anticipate future treatment requirements and reinforce prognosis.
Knowing that there is always a Vet Open in Melbourne when your pet is ill is important. Our team of Vets and Nurses really CARE for your pet. We try and make a difference with each patient. Our Centres are open each day. We are 24 hour pet emergency centres. Our two locations means that we can service most Melbourne suburbs including Vet Open Sunday.

Find us at:

ESSENDON (03) 9379 0700
POINT COOK (03) 8368 7400
A Melbourne Animal Hospital providing Advanced Vetcare for pets. No Appointment required. We are a centre for referral and emergency.

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