24 hour Pet Hospital, 24hr Vet, Animal Emergency, Animal Hospital, Animal Hospital Melbourne, Emergency Vet, Melbourne Animal Hospital, Pet, Uncategorized, Vet

Looking for a Vet in Port Melbourne

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Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre. We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Port Melbourne.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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www.animalemergency.com.au

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24 hour Pet Hospital, 24hr Vet, Animal Emergency, Animal Hospital, Animal Hospital Melbourne, Uncategorized, Vet

Looking for a Vet in Carlton North

GDV

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Carlton North.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.

Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.  There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.  Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

Animal Accident  Emergency Logo 2013

www.animalemergency.com.au

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A nervous but brave 4 year old Chihuahua

Tank 4

Tank a nervous but brave 4 year old Chihuahua just come in to our 24hr Animal Hospital in Essendon. Tank had been stung by Bee in his right hind paw.

Tank was very brave as Dr Yenny Indrawirawan our Resident Emergency Vet removed the sting from his paw then gave him a Histamil and Dexamethasone injection.
Wasps & Bee stings can cause a mild or severe allergic reaction, although most dogs and cats (like most humans) are not allergic to bees or wasps.
If the reaction to the sting is severe it can cause the airways to close causing your pet to asphyxiate, the sting doesn’t have to be near the face to cause this to happen. If your pet collapses or if there is any swelling around the face or throat, trouble breathing, pale gums or pain, try and have your pet taken to your veterinary clinic immediately.

For more information on Pet First Aid for Wasps & Bee Stings

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www.animalemergency.com.au

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Intern Rounds – Arrhythmias

intensive care

This week at the Animal Accident & Emergency Intern Rounds, the team are discussing arrhythmias. Just like in people we frequently run ECG’s.

ECG are a way of assessing the electrical activity of the heart. It checks to see if your heart is beating correctly. When the electrical activity is abnormal then your heart may beat too fast, too slow or a combination of problems. In our emergency centres we run ECG’s routinely on our sick patients, looking for diseases of the heart or other diseases that may affect the heart.

In this weeks rounds, the team are revising ECG identification and discussing the latest information on medications that are used when to help the heart in a crisis.

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24 hour Pet Hospital, 24hr Vet, Animal Emergency, Animal Hospital, Animal Hospital Melbourne, Cat, Cat tips, Dog, Dog tips, Dogs, Emergency Vet, severe allergic reaction

Pet First Aid – Wasps & Bee stings

Bee & wasp

Wasps & Bee stings can cause a mild or severe allergic reaction, although most dogs and cats (like most humans) are not allergic to bees or wasps. 

If the reaction to the sting is severe it can cause the airways to close causing your pet to asphyxiate, the sting doesn’t have to be near the face to cause this to happen. If your pet collapses or if there is any swelling around the face or throat, trouble breathing, pale gums or pain, try and have your pet taken to your veterinary clinic immediately.

SIGNS

  • Bees and wasps commonly sting around the mouth, lips and sometimes on the feet 
  • A swelling at the site of the sting 
  • Drooling 
  • Vomiting 
  • Pain at the site of the sting 
  • Itchiness at the site of the bite or over the whole body 
  • Pawing at the mouth 
  • Difficulty breathing

FIRST AID

  • Remove the sting if you can find 
  • Apply a cool face washer or wash the area with cool water 
  • Contact your vet for further advice

 

Animal Accident & Emergency is running 1 day Pet First Aid Courses on Sunday  24th November 2013, 1st & 15th December 2013.

 ENROL ONLINE or find out more http://www.animalemergency.com.au/pet-first-aid-course.html

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Rusty diagnosed with Poymetra

Rusty

 

Today we had the pleasure of discharging Rusty.  Rusty is a lovable energetic staffy who was transferred to our Point Cook 24hr Pet Emergency Centre  on Monday.  Rusty was diagnosed with a condition termed Pyometra.  Pyometra (Pyo for short) is where the uterus is full of fluid, usually with an infection / pus.

The infection makes the dogs feel really sick and in the worst cases can result in death.  With Rusty, the best option as part of the treatment was emergency surgery.

Late on Monday night, Rusty had exploratory surgery and her uterus was removed.  Since that time, Rusty has made a slow and steady recovery. The great news for Rusty and her owners is that she is now well enough to head home for some much needed TLC.

Good luck Rusty and we hope to see you back in a couple of days for a recheck.

 

The typical signs of dogs with a Pyo:

  •  Usually older dogs
  • Might have an unusual season or have been in season in the last 6 weeks
  • Appear to be drinking more water than normal
  • General lethargy / sickness
  • Often are not wanting to eat or are vomiting

 

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Pet Emergency: Vomiting

 

 

Vomiting

Vomiting is the forceful ejection of stomach contents from the mouth.  Acute vomiting is defined as vomiting of short duration (less than 5-7 days) whilst chronic vomiting has been present for longer.  There can be many causes for vomiting and some are less serious than others.  Recovery from non-serious causes, such as eating a different diet, is usually fast and requires little treatment.  The presence of blood in the vomit, continued vomiting in a pet that is becoming quieter than usual or is unable to keep any food or water down will require examination and assessment.  Very young animals can become dehydrated very quickly and they should be examined and treated early to prevent the dehydration from becoming severe.

If you are unsure whether your pet needs to be seen today, telephone our staff for advice.  Whatever the time of day, our 24 hour emergency clinics are able to examine your pet and make recommendations for treatment.  In some cases, investigation will also be recommended and this may be by means of blood and urine tests, x-rays and/or ultrasound examination of the abdomen.   These can all be performed in our clinics and depending on the test results, we will either prescribe appropriate medical therapy, recommend examination and management by our internal medicine specialist or advise surgical treatment.

When vomiting is non-responsive to medical treatment or has been intermittent but chronic, the emergency veterinarian or your local general practice will recommend investigation into the underlying cause by the internal medicine specialist. Again this is likely to involve blood and urine tests, x-rays or ultrasound examination of the abdomen, endoscopy and biopsy of the stomach and intestines. In some cases, surgery will either be recommended to complete the diagnostic testing or to treat the cause of the vomiting (for example removal of a foreign object, such as a sock, from the intestines).

Treatment recommendations will be made on the basis of the test results.  This may involve intravenous fluids if the patient is dehydrated, dietary changes and administration of medications (tablets or liquids to be given by mouth) or surgery.

 

 

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