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Pet First Aid Workshop held 3rd August 2013

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Animal Accident & Emergency is running a 3 hour Pet First Aid workshop course.

This course is open to the public and recommended for those who work with pets – foster carers, pet sitters, rescue workers etc

For more information or to enrol, click on the link:

http://www.petemergencystore.com.au/pet-first-aid-3hr-workshop.html

 

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Diaphragmatic Hernias

 Diaphragmatic hernias Vet Emergency

Our 24 Hr Pet Emergency Centres often see cases of trauma.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital that is Always Open, we understand what is required in such a pet emergency.  If your pet is injured from a significant trauma, ensure you speak to veterinarian to ensure that X-Rays / Radiographs of the chest (Thorax) were taken.  Even if your pet looks well after a trauma, you should have them checked.

Dr Jason Arlaud one of our team of emergency vets has summarised the following article for you from “Small Animal Critical Care” by Silverstein and Hopper.

Diaphragmatic hernias occur when there is a “hole” in the diaphragm.  The diaphragm is a sheet of tissue that separates the thorax, where the lungs and heart reside from the abdomen where the: bladder, intestine, kidneys, liver, stomach and spleen reside.

Dogs and cats may be born with a diaphragmatic hernia (congenital) which is rare or develop one from an unknown cause (iatrogenic) or as a consequence of trauma.

Blunt trauma due to vehicular accidents, high-rise syndrome (falling from apartments) or dog fights are the most likely causes.  Trauma accounts for eighty five percent of diaphragmatic hernias in dogs and cats.  In traumatic diaphragmatic hernias usually one or more of the abdominal organs (stomach, liver, intestine etc.) has as a consequence of force, been pushed through the diaphragm into the chest, causing a tear in the diaphragm.  Once one or more abdominal organs are in the chest there is the potential to affect the heart and lung’s normal function.  This leads to difficulty getting enough oxygen into the body and the animal breathing at a faster rate. Complications may be fatal.

Animals that present to veterinary clinics and are subsequently diagnosed with a diaphragmatic hernias may vary in their breathing pattern from normal to struggling to breath (dyspnoeic).  Their breathing may worsen hours after they were injured in some cases. Dyspnoeic animals will have a fast breathing rate, they may have their mouth open and neck stretched to try and get as much oxygen into their lungs as possible.

Organs most likely to be pushed through the diaphragm are: stomach, liver, intestine, omentum and spleen. The liver is the organ most likely to herniate.  Most insults occur on the right side of the diaphragm possibly due to the stomach sitting on the left side and being gas filled it may cushion some of the force.

Diaphragmatic hernias are suspected when certain findings are observed on examination including: borborygmus (stomach sounds) over the chest, abnormal heart and lung sounds, displacement of heart,  lungs or trachea by abdominal organs, pleural effusion or an incomplete diaphragm on radiograph and signs or history consistent with trauma.

Other associated injuries may include:  pleural effusion, pulmonary contusions (bruising), pneumothorax (air in the chest cavity) chest wall disease (broken ribs).

What often kills a pet with such trauma is the damage that occurs to the lungs and lung tissue.  Usually if a trauma was severe enough to rupture the diaphragm, it will have caused bruising to the lungs.  If the lungs are severely damaged then pets can die, despite all treatment.

Treatment involves stabilisation from shock and eventual surgery.  This type of injury is very painful and we do use a significant amount of pain medication.  Our main concern in our Melbourne Animal Hospital is ensuring your pet is in the best possible condition for surgery to occur.  Our 24Hr Pet Emergency Centres provide some of the most advanced monitoring equipment available.  Our Blood Gas unit helps identify problems with their lungs.  The tests are run as needed and we have the results available within 1 minute of collection.  In the most severe cases we use a ventilator to help improve breathing and lung function.  Ventilators are not common at most veterinary clinics and for diaphragmatic hernias they may make the difference between your pet surviving.

If your pet is involved in an accident then we urge you to have them checked by a Vet Now Open.  We have two convenient locations for our Melbourne Pet Emergency Centres.

 

We are Always Open, We always CARE

Essendon Airport – Essendon Fields 9379 0700

Point Cook – 8368 7400

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Pyometra can be fatal if left untreated

Pyometra Emergency Vet

What is Pyometra?

Pyometra is a severe uterine infection, causing inflammation and the accumulation of pus in the uterus, which occurs in entire female dogs and cats and can happen at any age. However, there is a higher chance of it occurring in older animals, especially when they go through several estrus cycles (heat) without becoming pregnant, as the changes to the uterine wall can further promote the disease. Pyometra is a highly seriously condition that requires immediate and aggressive emergency pet care at a 24 hour vet clinic. If left untreated, pyometra can be fatal.

Pyometra is the result of bacteria gaining access to the uterus through the cervix, which is normally tightly closed except for when the animal is in season. When pregnancy does not occur during the heat cycle, especially for multiple cycles, the lining of the uterus begins to thicken and will keep doing so each cycle, which will often result in cysts forming. When the uterus is normal, the invading bacteria are easily eradicated. However, when the uterus becomes thickened and cystic, it creates the perfect environment for bacteria to thrive, which leads to infection and the animal becoming seriously ill.

 

Pyometra in a Cat

The clinical signs of pyometra will generally show between 6-8 weeks after heat, but the signs vary depending on the type of the disease that is present. There are two types of pyometra:

  • Open pyometra – meaning the cervix is open and pus can drain from the uterus, creating an obvious vaginal discharge
  • Closed pyometra – meaning the cervix is closed and not allowing pus to drain, making it more difficult to diagnose

The main clinical signs that pet owners need to be aware of are:

  • Increased drinking and urination
  • Lethargy and depression
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Fever
  • Vaginal discharge (Open pyometra only)
  • Frequent licking/cleaning of vaginal area (Open pyometra only)

If pet owners ever notice their animal displaying any of these signs, they need to contact a 24hr veterinarian immediately, as deterioration can occur very rapidly.

Animals that are brought in early may only display slight vaginal discharge and no other clinical signs. However, most pets are brought in when the disease is more advanced and showing additional signs. In order to diagnose pyometra, 24hr emergency vets will need to examine the pet’s medical history and perform a physical examination and diagnostic tests, such as x-rays, ultrasounds and blood tests.

The main treatment for pyometra is to firstly stabilise the pet with IV fluids and pain relief, and then surgically remove the infected uterus. The surgery is very similar to a routine spey (ovariohysterectomy) and has a high success rate if animals are brought in early. However, it is often more complicated due to the pus in the uterus causing risk of further infection in the abdomen (peritonitis).

After surgery, pets will need to remain in a 24 hour pet hospital for several days for ongoing monitoring and intensive care. After this time, pets will then be sent home with pain relief and antibiotics and will need to rest for a few days and be closely monitored. They will also require a follow up appointment at the veterinary clinic in 10-14 days to remove the sutures.

The alternative treatment of pyometra is a medical approach, but this is rarely recommended due to being quite complex and having a high chance of nasty side-effects occurring. The medical treatment also has a low success rate and pyometra is likely to occur again after the pet’s next season.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may have anaemia or for any emergency, please phone one of our 24-hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Always Open, We Always Care

 

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Anaemia in Pets

Anaemia dog gums

Anaemia is not in itself a specific disease, but rather the result of another underlying disease/injury, which causes pets to have a reduced number of red blood cells. Depending on the severity level, anaemia on its own can be life threatening and may require emergency vet care, but what is usually more concerning for the pet’s health is the underlying disease/injury that is causing it to become anaemic.

There are three main causes of anaemia in cats and dogs – diseases/injuries that cause blood loss; diseases that decrease the production of red blood cells; and diseases that cause haemolysis (which is the destruction or breakdown of red blood cells). Anaemia caused by blood loss is often the result of serious trauma or injuries that sever blood vessels or damage internal organs. It can also be the result of excessive parasite activity on the animals, or tumours in areas of the body such as the intestinal tract, kidneys, urinary bladder or spleen, which cause internal bleeding.

The most common cause of reduced blood cell production is any severe or chronic disease, such as cancer, renal disease or cardiac disease. However, it can also be caused by poor nutrition, autoimmune disease, hypothyroidism, or toxicity. Anaemia caused by haemolysis can also be the result of the same diseases like autoimmune disease, cancer or toxicity, as well as blood parasites.

The first clinical signs of anaemia that pet owners will witness are their cat or dog appearing to have little stamina and seeming lethargic or tired, as well as having pale gums. When these signs are displayed the pet will need to be seen at a 24 hour vet clinic for examination. Unless there is an obvious injury or chronic disease that is found to be causing the anaemia, a range of tests will need to be performed to determine what is causing the disease. These tests include taking a blood sample to measure the red blood cell and haemoglobin count. This blood sample will also be used to test for increased numbers of immature red blood cells (known as reticulocytes) to ensure the pet’s bone marrow is responding correctly to the need for more red blood cells. It often takes at least 3-5 days for the body to realise it is anaemic and start releasing immature red blood cells from the bone marrow.

Tests may also be done by the veterinarian to check for parasite activity or any evidence of abnormal cells that may be caused by leukaemia. In some cases, other tests may include a reticulocyte count, bone marrow biopsy, a biochemical profile or urinalysis, or a faecal exam. These tests will help the emergency vet to determine the overall health of the animal and check whether the animal’s organs are functioning normally.

If the anaemia is severe then it can certainly be life threatening and need emergency vet care, which will often involve a blood transfusion. However, a transfusion is not a cure for anaemia, it is used to stabilise the animal and allow time to conduct the diagnostic tests needed to find the underlying disease causing the anaemia. Treatment for the anaemia and the underlying disease will require intensive care and ongoing monitoring at a 24 hour animal hospital to allow for the best chance of success and recovery.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be have anaemia or for any emergency, please phone one of our 24-hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Always Open, We Always Care

 

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Pain Medication – What Pet Owners Need to Know

Pain medication

 Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) are often prescribed by veterinarians for the treatment of pain, fever and inflammation. They are incremental in improving the quality of pet care for cats and dogs, as they allow for pet owners to treat their animals with pain relief at home, which was not possible to do safely until recently. For cats and dogs that are recovering from a serious injury or dealing with ongoing highly painful conditions/diseases such as arthritis, NSAIDs are essential to ensure they stay as healthy and happy as possible.

While NSAIDs are safe and highly effective, they are still prone to side effects like all medications. When animals are prescribed with NSAIDs, it is important that pet owners understand the correct doses that should be administered and what complications may arise.

Common side effects of NSAIDs are:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Dark-coloured faeces
  • Increased/decreased water consumption and urination
  • Lethargy
  • Itchiness
  • Seizures

These side effects are more common when medications are given in large doses or long term, but they can also occur even within the first few days of treatment. If pet owners ever notice any of the above side effects when treating their pet’s with NSAIDs, they should cease administering any further doses and contact a 24 hour veterinary clinic immediately, as it could be an animal emergency.

When pets are given NSAIDs it is important for pet owners to note the following:

  • Never increase the dosage or frequency of doses, unless instructed to by your vet
  • Never dose your pet in combination with over-the-counter medications (such as herbal supplements), unless you have consulted with your veterinarian that it is safe to do so
  • Never administer other animals with the NSAIDs without first consulting with your vet, even if you believe they have the same condition

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook – both with easy freeway access and ample parking. Our animal hospitals are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating every vet emergency from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that they will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be having an adverse reaction to pain medications, or for any veterinarian emergency, please phone one of our 24 hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

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Bladders Stones Cause Substantial Pain in Dogs & Cats

bladder stones 2

Bladder stones are clumps of minerals that form hard pebble-like substances in the bladder, usually either becoming one large stone or a collection of smaller stones within a matter of weeks to a month. As is the case with humans, they are also not uncommon in cats and dogs, and are generally caused by diet, other bladder diseases or the body’s metabolism failing to dissolve the minerals in the urine. Luckily, they can be treated effectively and be prevented from occurring again with the right diet and appropriate vet care.

While bladder stones can cause substantial pain and distress to the affected animal, they are generally not considered life threatening. However, in some cases bladder stones can become so large that they obstruct the bladder, while other stones can be so tiny that they can pass into the urethra and also cause urinary obstruction. When either form of obstruction occurs, this becomes a serious pet emergency with the imminent potential to cause the bladder to rupture, and there is a high risk of death.

Pet owners will often see signs if their cat or dog does develop bladder stones, such as blood in the urine or straining to urinate. Animals will generally also display signs of distress and pain, especially when urinating. While these symptoms are similar to other more common bladder infections that may not be as serious, if pet owners ever see these clinical signs then they should visit a 24 hour vet clinic and consult a veterinarian immediately.

The tests needed to determine if your pet does have bladder stones will depend on the type and severity of the bladder stones present in the animal. In rare cases where the bladder stones are large enough, a 24hr emergency vet will occasionally be able to simply feel them through the abdominal wall. However, this is often not possible and therefore if the emergency vet still believes bladder stones may be the cause of the animal’s symptoms then x-rays or ultrasounds may be required.

Bladder stones

In order to treat bladder stones, there are two main options – surgical removal of the stones or medically dissolving the stones. The method chosen by the emergency vet will firstly depend on whether the animal has a bladder obstruction, in which case surgery is usually required, otherwise the type of bladder stones found and the age and other health conditions of the affected pet will be key considerations. Dissolving a bladder stone is often not the preferred method, as it can take upwards of a month to dissolve the stones and requires very strict dietary conditions for pet owners to adhere to. Additionally, if medical treatment is undertaken then there is a risk of further urethral obstruction occurring as the stones become small enough to pass into the urethra.

If your pet does require surgery as part of their treatment, then they will also need to remain in an animal hospital for ongoing 24 hour monitoring while they recover. Once the cause of the bladder stones has been resolved, the veterinarian will be able to determine the best course of action (be that dietary or further medical treatment) to prevent bladder stones from occurring again.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may have bladder stones or for any emergency, please phone one of our 24-hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centres:

 

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

Always Open, We Always Care

 

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Happy Easter from Animal Accident & Emergency

 

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Animal Accident & Emergency would like to wish everyone a safe and a very Happy Easter

Over the Easter Holidays our 24 Hr Animal Hospitals will be available to help you at anytime. Our Emergency Vet Hospitals have Veterinarians on shift at all times. Both our centres are located so that they can service Melbourne and surrounding suburbs. Our Point Cook 24Hr Pet Emergency Centre services Geelong and the surf Coast.

If you have concerns or you are looking for a vet that is now open, please phone our Essendon Pet Emergency Centre on 9379 0700 or our Point Cook 24 Hr Emergency Animal Hospital on 8368 7400.

Our Vet Clinics are Always Open, We always CARE

 

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Vet Clinic open Easter Holidays

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During the Easter break our 24 Hr Animal Hospitals will be available to help you at anytime. Our Emergency Vet Hospitals have Veterinarians on shift at all times. Both our centres are located so that they can service Melbourne and surrounding suburbs. Our Point Cook 24Hr Pet Emergency Centre services Geelong and the surf Coast. If you have concerns or you are looking for a vet that is now open, please phone our Essendon Pet Emergency Centre on 9379 0700 or our Point Cook 24 Hr Emergency Animal Hospital on 8368 7400.

Our Vet Clinics are Always Open, We always CARE

 

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Vet Open Easter Holidays

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If you need a Vet over the Easter Holidays (Good Friday, Easter Sunday & Easter Monday) Animal Accident & Emergency is OPEN 24/7.

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We operate 24hrs a day and never close. Our team is ready to deal with all emergencies. Emergency and critical care is our core business and we often treat dogs or cats hit by a car (Trauma), dog or cat poisonings (Toxicities), breathing trouble (respiratory distress), or chronic medical conditions when your vet is not available.

 

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Easter Opening Details

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During the Easter break our 24 Hr Animal Hospitals will be available to help you at anytime. Our Emergency Vet Hospitals have Veterinarians on shift at all times. Both our centres are located so that they can service Melbourne and surrounding suburbs. Our Point Cook 24Hr Pet Emergency Centre services Geelong and the surf Coast. If you have concerns or you are looking for a vet that is now open, please phone our Essendon Pet Emergency Centre on 9379 0700 or our Point Cook 24 Hr Emergency Animal Hospital on 8368 7400.

Our Vet Clinics are Always Open, We always CARE.

 

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Animal Hospital OPEN Easter holidays

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Our Melbourne Animal Hospitals will be OPEN over the Easter Holidays (Good Friday, Easter Sunday & Easter Monday).

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We operate 24hrs a day and never close. Our team is ready to deal with all emergencies. Emergency and critical care is our core business and we often treat dogs or cats hit by a car (Trauma), dog or cat poisonings (Toxicities), breathing trouble (respiratory distress), or chronic medical conditions when your vet is not available.

 

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Knowing When Your Pet Needs a Caesarean

Animal Hospital Animal Accident Emergency Puppies

A caesarean section is a major surgical procedure used to deliver babies when normal birth isn’t possible. This is done by surgically entering the abdomen to remove the babies directly from the uterus. While caesareans are sometimes needed for cats, they are a lot more common with dogs, especially particular breeds such as bull dogs. However, birth complications are life threatening to all mothers and their offspring when delivery isn’t progressing normally, regardless of species or breed. Therefore, pets experiencing birth complications may be in need of a caesarean and must be taken to a 24 hour vet clinic immediately for emergency surgery.

In most cases, pet owners won’t be aware that their pet is in need of a caesarean until they begin giving birth. When your pet is pregnant and close to giving birth, it is important to keep a close eye on them, especially during the delivery, and be at the ready to take them to a 24hr animal hospital in an emergency.

When your pet is in labour, the most obvious signs that they may be in need of a caesarean are:
• Your pet has been having contractions for more than 2 hours without delivering a puppy/kitten (even after the first delivery)
• Your pet appears too tired to push out the puppy/kitten
• There is a puppy/kitten stuck in the birth canal
• If your pet hasn’t delivered all puppies/kittens (providing you have had x-rays taken to determine the litter size)
• If there is a green discharge from the vulva and no puppies/kittens are produced

A caesarean section will normally take between 1-1.5 hours by an experienced emergency veterinarian and then a further 1-3 hours for recovery in a pet hospital. During the surgery and post-operative care, your pet will be closely monitored and administered anaesthetic, pain relief, IV fluids and antibiotics. Puppies/kittens will also be closely monitored to ensure they are suckling well and kept clean, dry and warm.

Generally within a few hours after surgery, your pet and her new puppies/kittens will be discharged to return home. It is important to allow your pets to have some time alone together to feed and bond, while still keeping an eye on them. Pet owners should also remember to bring their pet in for a veterinary check-up 1-2 days after surgery, and stitches will need to be removed in 10-14 days following surgery. Your vet will be able to instruct you on any additional pet care required and schedule an appropriate time to begin vaccinations and worming treatment (usually between 3-6 weeks after birth).

It is important to closely monitor your pet and her new puppies/kittens and contact a 24 hour veterinary clinic if you have any concerns at all. If you notice any of the following then it may be an animal emergency (such as mastitis, eclampsia or unwell puppies/kittens), which needs to be seen by a 24hr emergency vet urgently:

  • The puppies/kittens aren’t feeding regularly or at all (roughly every 3 hours is normal)
  • The puppies/kittens are crying excessively (they should be sleeping or feeding 90% of the time)
  •  The puppies/kittens are cold (their environment should be kept at roughly 30°c)
  •  The caesarean wound is discharging, red or inflamed
  •  Mammary glands are swollen, inflamed, hard or painful
  •  Mother reluctant to nurse or appears impatient with the puppies/kittens
  •  Any signs of fever/high temperature, shaking, tremors, seizures or high heart rate

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour Animal Hospitals in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

If you believe your pet may be in need of a caesarean section or for any other veterinarian emergency, please contact one of our 24-hour animal emergency centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

Always Open. We Always CARE

 

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Marijuana Toxicity in Pets: The Green Stuff, the Dream Stuff

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Marijuana is one of the most commonly used recreational drugs worldwide and is also known by a variety of other names such as ‘weed’ and ‘pot’. Marijuana comes from the plant Cannabis sativa and the term ‘marijuana’ refers to the various parts of the plant such as the stems, leaves, seeds and flowers.

Apart from its use as a recreational drug, there is active ongoing research into the potential medicinal uses of marijuana for the management of conditions in humans such as chronic pain and multiple sclerosis. In fact, marijuana has already been approved for medical use in some places around the world. Unsurprisingly, the increased use of marijuana in humans has also resulted in an increasing number of animals being presented to veterinary clinics suffering from marijuana toxicity after accidental exposure to marijuana products.

This article will describe the common methods of intoxication and clinical signs seen in patients. We hope that readers will be able to better recognise early signs of intoxication and seek early medical intervention for their pets in the event of intoxication. If you believe your pet has ingested a drug, you need to contact our 24 hour vet Melbourne.

Commonly Encountered Forms of Marijuana

  • Unprocessed plant parts (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds)
  • Marijuana or hash cookies, brownies, candy
  • Marijuana (THC) in butter
  • Marijuana in cigarettes or ‘joints’
  • Marijuana in modified pipes or ‘bongs’

Why is marijuana toxic?

The major active component in marijuana is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and can be found in varying levels throughout the different parts of the plant. Intoxication may occur via various means such as ingestion of a marijuana product (most common) and inhalation of toxic smoke. Once absorbed, THC is rapidly distributed around the body and exerts its toxic effects by binding to specific receptors within the brain and the rest of the body. While the effects of THC are yet to be fully determined, studies have found that clinical signs are related to the amount of marijuana ingested, and intoxicated animals often present with signs such as altered mentation or gastrointestinal signs such as vomiting.

  • Depression, tremors, coma
  • Ataxia (unstable gait/walk)
  • Disorientation/Hyperexcitability
  • Hypersalivation

 

Cardiovascular Signs

  • Bradycardia (Slow heart rate)
  • Tachycardia (Rapid heart rate)

 

Metabolic Changes

  • Hyperthermia (High body temperature)
  • Hypothermia (Low body temperature)

 

Gastrointestinal Signs

  • Vomiting

 

Making a diagnosis

A diagnosis can usually be made based on history provided by owners, known or witnessed ingestion of marijuana and suggestive clinical signs. However, in the event where there is no known exposure, a presumptive diagnosis can still be made based on clinical signs and resolution of clinical signs after treatment. However, a definitive diagnosis can be obtained from analysis of stomach content or urine of affected animal if required. Our pet hospitals stock urine identification tests that aid in the diagnosis.

Treatment

There is currently no specific antidote for THC toxicity. Treatment consists of supportive care and symptomatic therapy. Most pets will need to be admitted to our veterinary hospital.

In cases that present acutely after ingestion, decontamination via the induction of emesis (vomiting) may be attempted if patients are still conscious and alert. In severe cases however, patients may present comatose and as such would require more aggressive measures such as gastric lavage (emptying) and enemas (manual emptying of rectal contents) to achieve rapid removal of marijuana from the body.

In addition, other supportive measures such as activated charcoal, muscle relaxants, ventilatory support (via the provision of oxygen), intravenous lipid administration and constant monitoring of the patient’s body temperature may also be required. Our Emergency Centres are open 24 hours / 7 days a week. Our intensive CARE units always have emergency vets on shift.

Prognosis

The prognosis for affected patients is generally optimistic. The majority of cases tend to recover within 5 days with no long-term adverse effects.

In severe cases however, recovery may be prolonged and complications such as death has been reported in cases of marijuana butter ingestion.

My pet has eaten marijuana! What should I do?

  • Stay calm and seek immediate veterinary attention for your pet
  • Give an honest history to your veterinarian, all details provided to us are kept strictly confidential
  • Do not attempt to induce vomiting or treatment at home
  • Making an unconscious animal vomit may cause it to aspirate the vomit and result in secondary aspiration pneumonia
  • Intoxicated animals can have an altered mentation and turn violent or aggressive without warning and cause serious injury to both itself and you
  • Attempting home treatment wastes valuable treatment time and prolongs the duration of your pet’s exposure to THC and increases the risk of potential complications

 

 

If you have any questions, please phone our emergency centres: Essendon 03 9379 0700 or Point Cook 8368 7400.

Our Centres are for Animal Referral and Emergency.

We are Always Open, We Always Care

 

References

  1. Meola SD, Tearney CC, Hass SA et al. Evaluation of trends in marijuana toxicosis in dogs living in a state with legalized medical marijuana: 125 dogs (2005-2010). JVECC 2012;22(6): 690-696.
  2. Fitzgerald KT, Bronstein AC, Newquist KL. Marijuana poisoning. Topics in Companion Animal Medicine 2013: 8-12.
  3. Osweiler GD, Hovda LR, Brulag AG et al. Marijuana. In: Osweiler GD, Hovda LR, Brutlag AG et al (eds). Blackwell’s Five-Minute veterinary Consult – Clinical Companion: Small Animal Toxicology. Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Iowa, 2011: 224-229.
  4. Volmer PA. Recreational Drugs. In: Peterson ME, Talcott PA (eds). Small Animal Toxicology. 2nd Edn. Elsevier Saunders, Missouri, 2006: 293-295.
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Avoiding Chocolate Toxicity During Easter

AnimalAE Easter Chocoate

 

Easter is just around the corner, which means that Melbourne households will soon be filling up with chocolate. While you should be cautious of chocolate around your pets at all times, Easter does pose an extra threat to dogs due the sheer volume of chocolate that is more readily available for them to snaffle while you’re not looking.

Chocolate toxicity is rarely fatal, but ingestion of chocolate in dogs does often lead to significant illness and so should be taken seriously by pet owners and treated as an animal emergency. As with all things, it’s better to be safe than sorry, so if you believe your dog has ingested any amount of chocolate you should immediately consult an emergency veterinarian and bring it in for examination at a 24 hour animal emergency centre.

Chocolate is dangerous to pets as it contains the alkaloid theobromine, which has similar effects as caffeine and is poisonous in large amounts. The toxicity level of the chocolate depends on the type and amount that is consumed, as well as the size of the dog. Toxic doses are generally considered to be 100mg of theobromine per kilogram of body weight, with fatal doses often occurring at over 200mg per kilogram.

Cooking/baking chocolate and dark chocolate pose the biggest danger, as they contain the largest concentration of theobromine. A 10kg dog would only have to eat 50 grams of milk chocolate to show clinical signs of chocolate toxicity or as little as 30 grams of dark chocolate. Whereas a mere 15 grams of baking chocolate (containing 70% cocoa) could lead to chocolate toxicity. Keep in mind that if the chocolate contains other harmful ingredients such as raisins/sultanas, alcohol or macadamia nuts then it may cause further complications.

The common clinical signs of chocolate poisoning are:

  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • increased thirst
  • panting or restlessness
  • excessive urination
  • muscle spasms and tremors
  • seizures
  • increased temperature
  • increased heart rate
  • abnormal behaviour

Older pets, or animals with pre-existing heart conditions, are more susceptible to the effects of chocolate poisoning and at higher risk of sudden death due to cardiac arrest.

During the Easter holidays, you need to be extra diligent in storing your Easter eggs safely out of reach of your pets. If you have children in the house, you also need to ensure that they don’t eat their chocolate around your pets, just in case they drop any or if you have a dog cheeky enough to swipe it straight from their hands while they’re not looking. You should also be cautious if you take your dog for a walk near a public park or school over the Easter long weekend, just in case an Easter egg hunt has taken place and any tasty surprises were left behind for your dog to find.

If your dog does need to be treated for chocolate toxicity, then the sooner they are brought in for examination, and the sooner the theobromine is removed from the body, then the better the prognosis will be. In some cases, if the dog is brought in early enough then all that may be necessary is using medication to induce vomiting to remove the chocolate from the stomach. For cases where the chocolate was ingested several hours earlier, the use of activated charcoal may be used to prevent the stomach and small intestine from further absorption of theobromine. As theobromine is excreted in urine, it is also common to use supportive treatments such as intravenous fluid theory to help dilute the toxin.

Close monitoring for the first 24 hours after poisoning is essential to check for any signs of irregular heart rhythm, so for the best and most advanced vet care available for your pet it is best to have them seen by our emergency vets in one of our 24 hour Animal Hospital.

In case of a chocolate toxicity or any emergency, please phone one of our 24hr Pet Hospital:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

 

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How to Keep Your Puppy Safe from Parvo (Parvovirus)

 

How to protect your puppy from Parvo

Parvo Puppy

Parvo (Parvovirus) is a relatively new disease found in dogs, which is highly contagious and potentially life threatening.

While any unvaccinated dog can contract parvo, it is most commonly found in dogs less than one year old  and puppies less than 5 months old are the most severely affected by the disease. Pet owners of unvaccinated dogs, especially of young puppies, need to be aware of the signs of parvovirus and know when their pet may be in need of emergency vet care. More importantly, pet owners need to be aware of what can be done to prevent their dogs from ever contracting parvovirus in the first place.

Parvo is spread through faeces and can be easily transmitted in a number of ways:

  • such as via the hair or the feet of infected dogs,
  • contaminated shoes and clothes,
  • or any other objects contaminated by the infected faeces.

Direct contact with an infected dog is not necessary for the disease to be spread, as parvovirus lingers in the environment for anywhere between 5-7 months and is notoriously difficult to kill. Parvo is resistant to the effects of heat, detergents, alcohol and most disinfectants, with the only known way of removing the virus from the environment being a chlorine bleach solution.

When the virus is ingested, either directly from faecal matter or any contaminated object, the disease passes into the dog’s intestine, affecting the intestinal wall and causing inflammation. Dogs affected with parvovirus will begin showing clinical signs and becoming ill within 6 to 10 days of being infected.

The first clinical signs of parvovirus are severe vomiting and diarrhoea, which is often strong smelling and may contain mucus and blood. Dogs may also become lethargic, feverish and lose their appetite, but these additional signs are not always displayed. Luckily, parvo can now be quickly diagnosed by use of a faecal test (SNAP® Parvo Test) in a 24 hour veterinary clinic, meaning treatment can commence immediately. However, it is not something that can be treated at home and will require the dog to remain in an animal hospital for 24 hour intensive care by an emergency vet.

IDEXX – SNAP® Parvo Test

While there is no treatment that can destroy the virus from an infected dog, with the appropriate vet care the virus can be brought under control and return the pet to good health. Parvo damages the dog’s intestinal tract lining resulting in severe dehydration, electrolyte imbalances and bloodstream infection, which results in death if untreated. Therefore, the main treatment for parvovirus includes the use of IV fluids, antinausea medications and antibiotics, with the chance of survival being high providing they are treated early and by an experienced 24 hour emergency vet.

The most important thing for pet owners to know is that parvo is preventable through proper vaccination. All pet owners should have their puppies vaccinated as part of their initial puppy vaccinations, which help to prevent a wide range of debilitating and life threatening illnesses. The parvovirus vaccine is a simple process of regular injections during a puppy’s first few months, followed up with a booster at one year of age and then revaccinations later in life. A veterinarian will be able to determine an appropriate schedule for administering all required vaccines and ensuring your dog is safe and healthy.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour pet emergency centres in Melbourne, which are ideally located in Essendon and Point Cook and both with easy freeway access and amble parking. Our emergency vet clinics operate 24 hours a day, 365 days a year (including public holidays), and offer all the latest equipment and state of the art technology, as well as a 24 hour intensive care unit. Our dedicated team of emergency vets and nurses provide the highest standards of emergency vet care, critical care medicine and surgery, and are experienced in treating all emergencies from right across Melbourne, Geelong and Ballarat. So when you bring your pet to Animal Accident & Emergency you can rest assured that your pet will receive the best and most advanced vet care available.

 

If you believe your pet may be have parvo or for any emergency, please phone one of our 24-hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centres.

 

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

 

We’re Always Open, We Always Care

 

 

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What to do When Your Dog Has a Seizure

AAE Dog Seizures

Watching your dog suffer through the violent, uncontrolled spasms of a seizure can be a very distressing sight, especially if you have never seen a seizure before or are unsure about what to do. While seizures are generally not dangerous to your dog, pet owners should be aware that seizures can indicate other underlying conditions and even cause subsequent problems. So it is always best to know what to do in the event of your dog experiencing a seizure, as well as when you should consider it as an animal emergency and call a 24hr vet clinic.

Also known as convulsions or fits, seizures are one of the most frequently seen neurological problems in dogs and consist of three phases. The first phase, known as the pre-ictal phase or aura, is a period where your dog may display abnormal behaviour, such as appearing nervous and restless, trying to hide or to find you, whining, shaking and salivating. This phase normally lasts between a few seconds to a few hours.

The second phase, or ictal phase, is the actual seizure itself, which lasts between a few seconds to about five minutes. During this phase, the muscles in your dog’s body will start to contract strongly, usually causing it to fall on its side with its head drawn backward and then appear paralysed while shaking uncontrollably. Your dog will generally be unresponsive during this time and may experience hallucinations. Involuntary urination, defecation and salivation can often occur during this period as well.

The third phase, or post-ictal phase, is the period where your dog will be coming out of the seizure and appear confused, disorientated and restless. They can also experience temporary blindness and memory loss, which may lead to further behavioural changes, such as not recognising you, aggression, pacing or running in circles. This phase can last between a few minutes to a few hours.

During the actual seizure, your dog doesn’t feel any pain and is generally unaware of what is happening. So the best thing to do is stay calm and move dangerous objects away from your pet so it can’t get hurt. If you are unable to move objects away from your dog, then move the animal carefully to a safe area where it cannot hurt itself or fall. Always remember that you should never try to restrain your dog during the seizure, as this may cause further harm. Also ensure that you do not place your hands near your dog’s mouth – animals cannot swallow their own tongue during seizures, but they may accidentally bite you.

There are many causes of seizures in dogs, with epilepsy being the most common. Other causes may also include liver disease, kidney failure, poisoning or brain tumours. To determine the cause, our 24hr emergency vets will need to thoroughly check your dog’s history for previous signs of seizures or abnormal behaviour. A physical examination and blood and urine tests will also need to be performed at our Melbourne animal hospitals to check for toxins or underlying illnesses or disorders of the liver, kidneys, electrolytes or blood sugar levels.

Depending on the severity and frequency of the seizures and the test results, the emergency vet may refer your dog to a Medicine Specialist for further tests and ongoing vet care. These further tests may include spinal fluid analysis, a CT scan or an MRI to look for brain diseases, inflammation, infections or tumours that may be causing the seizures. If your pet experiences more than one seizure every two months, status epilepticus, or two or more seizures in a 24-hour period, then they will generally be given anticonvulsant medication. This medication acts to prevent and reduce the frequency and severity of seizures and may need to be taken for life in some pet care cases.

Your pet needs to be seen by one of our 24-hour vets at our animal emergency centres for immediate vet care if your dog has never had a seizure before, or if they have had more than two seizures in a 24-hour period, or if the seizure lasts for longer than 5 minutes, or if they do not return to completely normal behaviour within 30 minutes after a seizure.

A seizure lasting longer than 5 minutes, known as Status Epilepticus, is especially serious and a potentially life threatening situation. If this occurs then your pet will need intravenous medication immediately or they may die. Please bring your family pet to see our experienced emergency vets so we can provide the best and most advanced vet care available in Melbourne.

In case of seizures or any emergency, please phone one of our 24 hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centres:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We’re Always Open, We Always Care

 

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The Benefits of Pet Insurance

Animal Accident Emergency Pet Insurance

 

Unfortunately, Australian pets don’t benefit from any government funded health care systems, like Medicare, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme or public hospitals, despite Australia having one of the highest levels of pet ownership in the world. This in turn means that medical treatment of animals can quickly become expensive, particularly in the treatment of severe injuries or chronic diseases due to the extensive resources and medical care required.

Fortunately, there are now a wide range of insurance providers supplying Pet Insurance, as well as a variety of plan options available with each to make it even more affordable and suitable to your needs. Cover can include accident only or accident, illness and even routine care, with costs starting from as little as a few dollars per week for dogs and cats. Plus a range of excess options can be chosen to keep the annual insurance fee down.

The primary benefit of getting Pet Insurance is of course peace of mind in knowing that you are always able to provide the best possible care for your pet in times of need. Pet Insurance allows you to visit any vet (whether it be your regular family vet, emergency vet or a specialist) and will generally cover upwards of 80% of the vet bill depending on the treatment required. Most basic covers will also include at least $7,000-$8,000 worth of total cover for the year, with some covering up to $20,000. So for only a few hundred dollars per year, you can be assured that your loved pets will always be able to receive care to keep them healthy and happy. More importantly, if your pet is ever unfortunate enough to require emergency or ongoing specialist treatment, having Pet Insurance takes money-worries out of an already highly stressful situation…leaving you to focus on what is most important, being with your pets and providing the love and support that they need.

Another benefit of Pet Insurance is that a portion of the proceeds generated by some insurance providers go towards helping other animals in need and animal charity organisations, such as the RSPCA and Guide Dogs Australia.

If you would like more information on Pet Insurance, below are website links to some of the most popular Pet Insurance providers:

 

 

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Snake Bites – Prevention and Treatment

tiger-snake

Summer is now officially over, but while the warm weather lingers so will snakes. The majority of pet snake bite cases occur on days that are over 20°C and most commonly between August to April, as snakes are more active during the warmer months and days. Snake bites occurring in August and September are often the most severe due to their venom being extra potent after waking from hibernation. However, it is wise to be cautious of snakes all year round, even during winter, as snakes will only fall into, and remain in, hibernation if the weather is cool enough… and they are extra grumpy when woken early.

While snakes aren’t naturally aggressive, snake bites in animals are more prevalent than in humans largely due to the different instinctual reactions when a snake is found. Dogs are very inquisitive and playful, so they will often stick their snout into dangerous areas and give chase to a fleeing snake, making the most common bite locations on their face and legs. Dogs are also extra vulnerable to snake bites as they are often bitten multiple times due to their playful nature. Whereas cats have a hunter instinct and will likely want to pounce on anything that moves, especially with the movement of a snake being reminiscent of common cat toys.

The best way to avoid your pets being bitten by snakes is to be extra careful and mindful of your pets in areas where snakes are commonly found, such as: parks, long grass, under rocks and fallen logs, anywhere near water bodies (including garden ponds), under your house, in the garden shed, and anywhere dark, secluded and warm. Also, you should always ensure that your dog is on a leash when going for a walk so that you will be able to restrain them if a snake crosses your path.

In Victoria, the most common snake bites are caused by Tiger Snakes, Brown Snakes and Red-Bellied Black Snakes. While it is good to know what type of snake has bitten your pet, it is not essential, as a snake venom detection kit can be used to determine the venom type. So never take any risks trying to catch the snake, but if the snake is already dead then it is good to take it with you to the vet. If you do come across a snake at home, it’s best to leave the snake where you found it and close any doors or gates if possible to block it in and then call a professional snake catcher or wildlife carer to remove it.

If you ever suspect your pet has been bitten by a snake then the best thing to do is keep yourself and your pet calm and act quickly, as time is of the essence and there is a higher chance of recovery if treated early. It’s also best to carry your pet if possible, as walking will increase venom circulation. Early signs that can appear within minutes after a snake bite are acute vomiting, diarrhoea and becoming weak and wobbly on their feet and potentially collapsing. These early signs are often followed by an apparent quick recovery, but it is still essential to seek medical care as quickly as possible as they can deteriorate rapidly after this stage. Other signs are red urine, bleeding from gums and mouth, salivating, dilated pupils and paralysis. Note that animals that have been bitten by snakes do not suffer from a lack of appetite or any swelling or necrosis like they may with spider bites, so do not expect these signs.

Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour emergency centres in Essendon and Point Cook that are fully equipped with state-of-the-art technology to treat all emergencies right across Melbourne. Antivenom is always kept on the premises and our experienced team of emergency vets and nurses are always at the ready to care for your pets.

In case of a snake bite or any emergency, please phone Animal Accident & Emergency:

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

We’re always open, We always CARE

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Animal Accident Emergency’s Marathon Effort to Save Courageous Beagle from Snake Bite

Pierre Snake Bite

It started out like any other day. Pierre, a 10-month old beagle, was out for a walk along Merri Creek in Coburg with his owner and friend when the unthinkable happened. Lachlan Scully, Pierre’s owner, was chatting to his friend when he heard a sudden and gut wrenching howl. Having no idea what had caused Pierre to cry out, and due to the almost instant vomiting and diarrhoea, Mr Scully rushed his beloved puppy to the Heritage Veterinary Clinic, where he collapsed upon arrival.

The consulting vet was concerned that Pierre had potentially been bitten by a snake, and therefore administered a vial of antivenom. However, due to his deteriorating condition and the venom causing paralysis of his respiratory muscles, Pierre was unable to breathe on his own and needed a mechanical ventilation machine to breath for him. Pierre was transferred to the 24-hour Animal Accident & Emergency Centre in Essendon, where our team of dedicated emergency vets and nurses were at the ready to continue treating him immediately.

After using a Snake Venom Detection Kit, it was confirmed that Pierre had indeed been bitten by a Tiger Snake and had severe envenomation. A second vial of antivenom was quickly given but, due to Pierre’s serious condition, he was still near death for days and the emergency team had a mammoth task ahead of them in order to keep him alive.

As is the case with all snake envenomations, especially with Tiger Snakes, there is usually more than just one problem that emergency vets need to treat simultaneously, making care of the envenomated patient very intensive. Pierre also suffered from bleeding in his gut and bladder, caused by the venom stopping his blood from clotting properly, so a plasma transfusion was needed to replace clotting factors in his blood. Additionally, he developed aspiration pneumonia due to paralysis preventing him from being able to swallow. His continuing respiratory paralysis meant that he had to remain on a life support ventilator for nearly 36 hours. The other conditions that the emergency team needed to treat were Acute Kidney Injury; severe muscle damage requiring strong pain medication; Vasculitis (leakage of fluid from his vessels) causing fluid accumulation in his abdomen and under his skin; anaemia (requiring a further blood transfusion); pancreatitis and liver damage.

Pierre quickly won the hearts of the Animal Accident & Emergency team, who gave their all and often came in on their days off to help care for the courageous beagle during his recovery. After a marathon effort and 11 days in hospital, all of his conditions were improving and he was given the go ahead to return home. Pierre will still require several weeks of rest and further checkups at AAE to ensure a full recovery, but after such a severe snake bite he is incredibly lucky to be alive.

Due to Pierre’s extreme circumstances and the amount of time and resources that were required to treat his life-threatening conditions, the final treatment cost reached just over $20,000. Treatment for snake bites isn’t normally quite so much, but Pierre was one of the worst snake bites that Animal Accident & Emergency have ever seen and required extensive medical care due to his many ailments. However, Mr Scully wasn’t worried about the cost and just wanted to do anything possible to save his much-loved beagle, and he had wisely bought Pet Insurance for Pierre, which thankfully covered over $7,000. Also, with thanks to the overwhelming public support, a fundraiser for Pierre has been organised for Saturday 30th March. More information can be found on the Facebook page created for Pierre.

If you ever suspect that your pet has been bitten by a snake, remember that time is of the essence and it needs to be treated as soon as possible. The longer you wait the more severe the condition will become. Animal Accident & Emergency have two 24 hour emergency centres in Essendon and Point Cook that are fully equipped with state-of-the-art technology to treat all emergencies right across Melbourne. Antivenom is always kept on the premises and our experienced team of emergency vets and nurses are always at the ready to care for your pets.

In case of a snake bite or any emergency, please phone Animal Accident & Emergency:

Essendon Fields     (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook              (03) 8368 7400

We’re always open, We always CARE

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Jackson 1 year old Burmese

1781979_10152993996417281_2130166687_n

Jackson presented to the emergency team on Sunday. He had been unwell for a few days. Jackson had been unwell from a snake bite in November and the signs that Jackson were showing were similar.

Jackson’s main reason for presentation was weakness and generally being unwell. On his physical exam he had neurological changes that we see with Tiger snake bite (Lower Motor Neuron weakness). The suspicion of snake bite was confirmed by a blood test that looked at muscle damage (CK).

For Jackson, there was a significant time period between being bitten and presentation to the Emergency Room. Jackson was tested for active venom using a Snake Venom Detection Kit. The kits look for free or active venom in blood or urine. We give anti-venom only to pets that have active or free venom.

Jackson did not require anti-venom, but he will need several days of hospital care to recover. He is resting well on an IV drip and receiving some nice pain relief medication. Jackson will remain in our 24 Hr pet Emergency Centre until he is ready for discharge, or if stable he will return to his family vet, the Diamond Creek Vet Clinic for continued care.

He is making progress, resting and soaking up all the love from our emergency nurses.

 

Always Open – We Always Care

 

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Animal Accident Emergency

NYDay
Animal Accident & Emergency is open 24 hours per day 7 days a week at two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

Our centres CARE for injured or sick pets anytime of the day. An emergency veterinary clinic is not the same as most vet clinics. Our aim is to work with your personal Vet to provide the best possible CARE for your pet.

Being an animal emergency centre, our vets and nurses are expertly trained to deal with all animal accidents and emergencies such as hit by car, dog attacks, snake bite, poisonings, acute vomiting and general illness. A large number of our vets have completed postgraduate training in the field. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

Our Emergency Centres are fully staffed to see any animal accident and emergency patients 24 hours per day 7 days a week, including weekends and public holidays, and no appointment is needed.

Always Open – We Always CARE

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24 hour pet emergency centre

 

vets & Pets

Always Open, We always CARE

Animal Accident & Emergency, is an emergency veterinary clinic located in 2 convenient locations – Essendon and Point Cook. Our centres CARE for injured or sick pets anytime of the day.  An emergency veterinary clinic is not the same as most vet clinics. Our aim is to work with your personal Vet to provide the best possible CARE for your pet.

We operate 24hrs a day and never close. Our team is ready to deal with all emergencies. Emergency and critical care is our core business and we often treat dogs or cats hit by a car (Trauma), dog or cat poisonings (Toxicities), breathing trouble (respiratory distress), or chronic medical conditions when your vet is not available.

Our emergency veterinary clinic is open 24-hours per day to attend to urgent conditions. We are always open including – vet open Sunday in Melbourne, we are open weekends, including all public holidays. If you need help, then please phone. One of our team, will be sure to assist you.

 

24 hour Pet Emergency Centre:

Essendon – 72 Hargrave Ave. Essendon Fields (inside the Essendon Airport Precinct) (03) 9379 0700

Point Cook – 6 Wallace Ave (Across from Oz Ten Bowling) (03) 8368 7400

 

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Pet owners are also being warned to be vigilant as the heatwave hits.

“Towns soar past 40C as heatwave hits Victoria”

Dr Scott Hall, of Animal Accident & Emergency in Essendon, said owners should relax exercise routines and make sure animals had water and shade.

“And if there is not enough shade in the backyard it is even worse – unfortunately people will come home to find their dog deceased,” he said.

Dr Hall said owners said pugs, bulldogs and other breeds with short noses were most at risk and he said long-haired dogs should be hosed down regularly.

If there is inadequate shade, Dr Hall recommended doggie day care over the heatwave.

 

For more information:

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/towns-soar-past-40c-as-heatwave-hits-victoria/story-fni0fit3-1226801011116

 

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Looking for a Vet in Albert Park

animals

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Albert Park.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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The hot weather is back with a vengeance this week.

dog and ice

The weather bureau has predicted heatwave conditions for at least the next 4 days. The chance of heat stress for your pets will be very high during this period.

Just like with people, our elderly pets or those with chronic diseases are at a very high risk. If your pet has a chronic illness, then you need to take extra care. The heat wave may affect your pet if they have the following chronic illnesses:

• Diabetes
• Chronic Heart Disease – especially if your pet takes diuretics (frusemide)
• Chronic airway disease
• Cushings or Addisons
• Chronic Renal Failure
• Receiving “steroids” for immune diseases
• Pets that have vomiting or diarrhoea – they will dehydrate very quickly

If your pet is classed as a “brachycephalic” (short squashed nose, for example a pug) then you need to take particular care.

These pets have trouble regulating their body temperature.

What to do:

• Any sign of illness – do not wait. Have your pet checked early rather than waiting
• Avoid exercising during the next few days
• Ensure there is plenty of drinking water – that cannot be knocked over
• If you have minimal shade at home – consider a doggy daycare or kennel your pet
• Ensure there is some form of cooling available – fans etc

Our 24Hr Pet Emergency Centres are available for advice or treatment at any time. Essendon 9379 0700; Point Cook 8368 7400;

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MEDICINE Patient Coordinator

vet pic 3

Animal Accident & Emergency Point Cook  is seeking a Medicine Patient Coordinator (MPC).  The MPC is a new position at our Point Cook 24Hr Pet Emergency Centre.  This is a nursing based position working directly with our medicine specialist, Dr Linda Abraham.  The position is designed to provide direct nursing support for medicine cases, assist in procedures, coordinate client appointments and follow up on the progress of our medicine patients.

Position Requirements

  • Certificate 4 or Diploma in Veterinary Nursing or equivalent
  • Manual Car Licence
  • Available to work Monday to Friday with occasional weekend or overtime required
  • High standard of written and computer skills
  • High standard of communication skills – this position involves significant client contact
  • Highly organised
  • Prior experience in referral or specialist centres (desirable)

Applications will close on the 30th of January 2014 unless a suitable applicant is found prior to this date.  A CV with 3 current referees should be forwarded to jobs@animalemergency.com.au.

For further information, please contact Ms Sonia Ross on 8368 7400 or Sonia.ross@animalemergency.com.au

 

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Looking for a Vet in Balaclava

dog pic

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Balaclava.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in City of Port Phillip

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Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from City of Port Phillip.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Coode Island

dog on the phone

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre. We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Coode Island. As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Docklands

vet pic 5

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Docklands.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Full Time Emergency Patient Care Co-ordinator Position

NURSES

Animal Accident & Emergency would like to announce that we now have a full time Patient Care Co-ordinator (PCC) position available.  We are looking for someone who is excited by emergency nursing and are looking for a challenge.  This position would ideally suit an experienced nurse.

The PCC role provides a critical link between clients and the healthcare team.  Liaising directly with the attending veterinarian, nursing team and clients to ensure that communication is maintained.  This is a customer service orientated role.  The role will commence on Monday 3rd February with a 2 week handover from the outgoing PCC.

 

Applications will close on 15th January 2014.  Please send a résumé to htm@animalemergency.com.au .  Attention your application to HealthCare Team Managers.

 

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Looking for a Vet in West Melbourne

dog pic 8

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from West Melbourne.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Southbank

dog pic 5

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Southbank.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.  There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.

We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in South Yarra

dog pic 2

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from South Yarra.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Pet Poisons from around the Home

Found this article from ASPCA website.  Some great simple information attached.  At our 24 hr. Pet Emergency Centre, we treat toxicities in Pets daily.  There are so many common toxins around the house.  If ever you are concerned, please phone our teams at Essendon 9379 0700 or Point Cook 8368 7400.   Always Open, we Always Care

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/poison-safe-home

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Looking for a Vet in Parkville

vet pic 9

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Parkville.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Fishermans Bend

vet pic 7

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Fishermans Bend.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in South Yarra

dog pic 2

 

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Port Melbourne

vet pic

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre. We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Port Melbourne.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Lost Pets after New Years Eve

Image

The Hangover for Pets

Welcome to 2014.  For most of us we are just starting o crawl out of bed and look for the Panadol. At both our 24 Hr. Pet Emergency Hospitals we have seen a large influx of stray / lost  pets post fireworks.  We often treat injured stray animals and working with local councils and The Lost Dog’s Home re-unite many of the lost pets. 

One thing that is common is that when people and pets move home, their microchip details are not updated.  So many pets have microchips, but phone numbers and addresses are not correct.  This can make it almost impossible to re-unite your pet to you,

If you have lost your pet overnight, please ensure that your you update your microchip details immediately

Central Animal Records     National Pet Register  

If you have lost your pet the contact either of our 24 Hr Animal Hospitals to see if we can help.  Other places that you should call:

Local Council  

Lost Dogs Home

All the Team at Animal Accident & Emergency hope that your pets are safe and well.  We are Always Open, We Always Care.  Essendon 9379 0700;  Point Cook 8368 7400;  www.animalemergency.com.au

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Happy New Year from AAE

 

happy new year dog

From all the team at Animal Accident & Emergency we would like to wish you a very “Happy New Year” for 2014!

Essendon Fields (03) 9379 0700
Point Cook (03) 8368 7400

Always Open, We Always Care.

 

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Looking for a Vet in Carlton North

GDV

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Carlton North.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.

Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.  There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.  Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in North Melbourne

vet pic 3

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from North Melbourne.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in Kensington

little boy and his pet

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre. We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Kensington.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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Looking for a Vet in East Melbourne

vets & Pets

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre. We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from East Melbourne. As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured. Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking. We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care. Two great locations: Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

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New Years is coming

2014 fire works happy new year

While the fireworks are often a very nice sight, they cause so much grief to our pets.  The biggest night will be New Year’s Eve.

Please be mindful that your pets are safe and secure if you go out at night.  If your pet does suffer from anxiety with the fireworks, contact your local vet today for advice.  There are many products including Thudershirts that can be purchased to help.

Our teams at Essendon and Point Cook are Always Open, We Always Care.  If you need then just phone: Essendon 9379 0700; Point Cook 8368 7400

 

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Looking for a Vet in Jolimont

 

animals

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Jolimont.

As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.

Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

 

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A Very Merry Christmas

merry christmas dogs

The team at Animal Accident & Emergency wish you and your special pets a very merry and safe Christmas and New Year.

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Looking for a Vet in Melbourne

vet pic 9

Animal Accident & Emergency is a full service Pet Emergency and Critical Care Centre.   We are open 24/7 and often receive patients from Melbourne.  As a Melbourne Animal Hospital we will care for your pet if they are sick or injured.  Our team includes Specialists in Internal Medicine and Emergency and Critical Care.

There is easy Access from the freeway and plenty of safe parking.  We are not just open after hours, we are a 24 hour vet hospital that specialised in Emergency and Critical Care.  Two great locations:  Essendon Fields and Point Cook.

 

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Cats and Hot Weather

cat and tap

Cats love nothing better than to lay in sunny spots around their homes. Catching a few morning rays, they are the picture of ultimate relaxation. But, as the summer heat starts to kick in  and temperatures start to climb, cats are going to be exposed to the dangers of heat stroke (hyperttheirmia). They will instinctively search for cooler spots to spend their time.  Their are some ways in which you can help your cat beat the heat and make their life bearable during the hot weather.

Invest in large, shady potted plants. Make sure they will provide ample shade for your cat. Check with your local vet to ensure they are not toxic.

Provide cat with cooler places to lie down.

If feasible, keep your air conditioner or cooler running throughout the day for the ultimate in comfort.

Leave your plug out of your sink and turn on the water just to a trickle. The noise of the water will bring cat in to investigate. They will play with the water.

Instead of giving ice water to your cat on hot days, which can worsen the situation simply provide them with clean, cool water daily.

Your cat may start panting. This is their first attempt to maintain their body temperature. They will also start to over-groom themself in an attempt to lower their body temperature. Once the saliva dries on their fur, they will begin to cool down.

You may notice when they walks across a tile floor, you will see moist paw prints left. Cats sweat through their foot pads. If your home is hot, and you don’t see moist paw prints, that should raise concern.

They may dig a large hole in their litter pan and park themself inside. Cats are originally desert-dwelling creatures. They instinctively know that the sand will bring welcome relief.

To provide relief to your cat  keep your curtains or blinds closed in the daytime. Plus, you can leave your windows wide open as well and your cat can’t escape.

If you allow your cat access to your balcony be sure the balcony is properly screened so they can’t fall off. Place large potted plants around the balcony to provide shade, or use  inexpensive screens to create a shady cave for your cat.

 

You can check for dehydration by:

Checking your cat’s mouth. Press your finger lightly against their gums (which should be pink and happy) Your print should leave an impression for about a second then the gums pink up again. If they stay pale, or appear streaked or white, get cat to the vet now.

You can also  check for dehydration, while yourcat is at rest, gently pick up the scruff of their neck, without lifting their body. Pinch the scruff lightly, release. The skin should fold down within seconds. If it remains in a pinched position- get your cat to the vet!

Summer is a time of relaxation and fun. But as the warmer months approach, be on the alert for any heat- related problems. If you find that your cat is in the middle of heat stroke, place a cool  wet towel around your cat while they are being transported to the vet.  If you put them inside a carrier for transport, be sure and place them on a cool, wet towel to help lower their body temperature.

 

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